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Developments in Global Food Prices


  • Vanessa Rayner

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Emily Laing

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Jamie Hall

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)


Global food prices have increased significantly since the early 2000s, reversing the long-run trend decline in relative food prices over previous decades. A range of supply disruptions in key food-producing countries have contributed to higher food prices, along with strong demand from developing countries as per capita incomes rise and consumption patterns change. Rising commodity prices are leading to higher headline consumer price inflation in many countries though, at this stage, core measures of inflation remain relatively contained.

Suggested Citation

  • Vanessa Rayner & Emily Laing & Jamie Hall, 2011. "Developments in Global Food Prices," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 15-22, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:rba:rbabul:mar2011-03

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alston, Julian M. & Beddow, Jason M. & Pardey, Philip G., 2009. "Mendel versus Malthus: Research, Productivity and Food Prices in the Long Run," Staff Papers 53400, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brendan Coates & Nghi Luu, 2012. "China's emergence in global commodity markets," Economic Roundup, The Treasury, Australian Government, issue 1, pages 1-30, May.
    2. Tim Atkin & Ellis Connolly, 2013. "Australian Exports: Global Demand and the High Exchange Rate," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 1-10, June.
    3. Alexandra Dwyer & George Gardner & Thomas Williams, 2011. "Global Commodity Markets - Price Volatility and Financialisation," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 49-58, June.
    4. Bradbear, Catherine & Friel, Sharon, 2013. "Integrating climate change, food prices and population health," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 56-66.


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