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Determinants of Growth and Convergence in Transitive Economies in the 1990s: Empirical Evidence from a Panel Data


  • Menbere T. Workie


This paper empirically examines the determinants of economic growth and convergence in transitive economies of Central and Eastern Europe in the 1990s. While the cross-section regression suggests the absence of a significant convergence across the EU15 and other transitive economies, the Visegrad four (Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland) dummy being positive and significant indicates that this group of countries has done relatively better than the other group of transitive economies. Moreover, the results indicate that there was an income per capita convergence within Visegrad countries. Switching to a panel data approach, and controlling for macroeconomic stability, financial development, human and physical capital accumulations and other policy variables, the results seem to suggest that there was a conditional convergence across EU15 and transitive economies in the 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Menbere T. Workie, 2005. "Determinants of Growth and Convergence in Transitive Economies in the 1990s: Empirical Evidence from a Panel Data," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2005(3), pages 239-251.
  • Handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpep:v:2005:y:2005:i:3:id:264:p:239-251

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier X., 1996. "Regional cohesion: Evidence and theories of regional growth and convergence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1325-1352, June.
    2. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    3. David Dollar & Craig Burnside, 2000. "Aid, Policies, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 847-868, September.
    4. Grier, Kevin B. & Tullock, Gordon, 1989. "An empirical analysis of cross-national economic growth, 1951-1980," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 259-276, September.
    5. Boone, Peter, 1996. "Politics and the effectiveness of foreign aid," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 289-329, February.
    6. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1994. "Cross-sectional regressions and the empirics of economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 739-747, April.
    7. Nazrul Islam, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-1170.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mihaela Simionescu, 2016. "The Real GDP Rate in European Union. A Panel Data Approach," Working Papers of Institute for Economic Forecasting 161001, Institute for Economic Forecasting.

    More about this item


    economic growth; transitive economies; convergence; panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models


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