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Greenhouse emissions and economic recessions: Did industrial economies “Stay Cool” during the 1930s economic crisis?

Author

Listed:
  • Vincentas Giedraitis

    () (Department of Theoretical Economics, Vilnius University, Lithuania.)

  • Sarunas Girdenas

    () (Department of Sociology,Vilnius University, Lithuania.)

  • Adomas Rovas

    () (Department of Molecular Biology, Vilnius University, Lithuania.)

Abstract

In this historical economic interdisciplinary research we investigate the impact of the 1930s economic crisis and their relationship to global warming. We investigate two consecutive hegemonic powers: the United Kingdom and the United States. Our assumption was that a reduction in demand would lead to a decrease in mean global temperatures during depressions. We find that in fact reduced carbon dioxide in the atmosphere resulting from lowered production does not result in cooling temperatures.

Suggested Citation

  • Vincentas Giedraitis & Sarunas Girdenas & Adomas Rovas, 2010. "Greenhouse emissions and economic recessions: Did industrial economies “Stay Cool” during the 1930s economic crisis?," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center, vol. 1(1), pages 46-50, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:pdc:jrnbeh:v:1:y:2010:i:1:p:46-50
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    2. Lorenzo Pellegrini & Reyer Gerlagh, 2004. "Corruption's Effect on Growth and its Transmission Channels," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(3), pages 429-456, August.
    3. Pastor, Manuel Jr. & Hilt, Eric, 1993. "Private investment and democracy in Latin America," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 489-507, April.
    4. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1995. "Institutions And Economic Performance: Cross-Country Tests Using Alternative Institutional Measures," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(3), pages 207-227, November.
    5. Khan, Mohsin S. & Reinhart, Carmen M., 1990. "Private investment and economic growth in developing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 19-27, January.
    6. Miguel D. RamírezAuthor-Email: Miguel.Ramirez@trincoll.edu, 2006. "Does foreign direct investment enhance private capital formation in Latin America? a pooled analysis for the 1981-2000 period," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 40(1), pages 81-97, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Historical economic sociology; Kondratiev wave theory; World-systems analysis; economic crises; global climate change;

    JEL classification:

    • B23 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Econometrics; Quantitative and Mathematical Studies
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • N50 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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