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Are Remittances Good for Your Health? Remittances and Nepal’s National Healthcare Policy

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Listed:
  • Brian Chezum

    () (St. Lawrence University)

  • Cynthia Bansak

    (St. Lawrence University)

  • Animesh Giri

    (Cornerstone Research)

Abstract

Abstract We examine the relationship between remittances and healthcare usage in Nepal. Nepal provides an important case study due to the recent introduction of a nationalized healthcare policy with heterogeneity across its districts. We find that remittance income leads to increased expenditures on higher-priced medical care and a higher likelihood of visiting a doctor. The medical spending results are stronger in districts targeted for social healthcare programs. While government initiatives to increase health care appear to be directing those with health needs to receive medical care, public funding or accessibility may be insufficient to adequately treat all needs.

Suggested Citation

  • Brian Chezum & Cynthia Bansak & Animesh Giri, 2018. "Are Remittances Good for Your Health? Remittances and Nepal’s National Healthcare Policy," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 44(4), pages 594-615, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:easeco:v:44:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1057_s41302-018-0106-9
    DOI: 10.1057/s41302-018-0106-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Valero-Gil, Jorge, 2008. "Remittances and the household’s expenditures on health," MPRA Paper 9572, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Acosta, Pablo & Fajnzylber, Pablo & Lopez, J. Humberto, 2007. "The impact of remittances on poverty and human capital : evidence from Latin American household surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4247, The World Bank.
    3. Cynthia Bansak & Brian Chezum & Animesh Giri, 2015. "Remittances, school quality, and household education expenditures in Nepal," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, December.
    4. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2011. "New evidence on the role of remittances on healthcare expenditures by Mexican households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 69-98, March.
    5. Maria Cristina Zhunio & Sharmila Vishwasrao & Eric P. Chiang, 2012. "The influence of remittances on education and health outcomes: a cross country study," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(35), pages 4605-4616, December.
    6. Alassane DRABO & Christian EBEKE, 2010. "Remittances, Public Health Spending and Foreign Aid in the Access to Health Care Services in Developing Countries," Working Papers 201004, CERDI.
    7. Allendorf, Keera, 2007. "Do Women's Land Rights Promote Empowerment and Child Health in Nepal?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 1975-1988, November.
    8. Sophia C. Terrelonge, 2014. "For Health, Strength, and Daily Food: The Dual Impact of Remittances and Public Health Expenditure on Household Health Spending and Child Health Outcomes," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(10), pages 1397-1410, November.
    9. Mendola, Mariapia, 2008. "Migration and technological change in rural households: Complements or substitutes?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1-2), pages 150-175, February.
    10. Cynthia Bansak & Brian Chezum, 2009. "How Do Remittances Affect Human Capital Formation of School-Age Boys and Girls?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 145-148, May.
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