IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/wbecrv/v23y2009i2p269-294.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Do Exporters Pay Higher Wages? Plant-level Evidence from an Export Refund Policy in Chile

Author

Listed:
  • Ivan T. Kandilov

Abstract

The impact of increased export activity on plant wages is estimated in a developing country context. To avoid potential endogenous selection problems, the empirical analysis benefits from exogenous variation in exports induced by a policy experiment--an export subsidy system implemented in Chile in 1986. Analyses using data from a panel survey of Chilean manufacturing establishments show that while the export subsidy had only a modest positive impact on the industrywide relative high-skilled wage, it significantly increased the plant-level relative high-skilled wage in medium-size establishments, which are most likely to take advantage of the subsidy and enter the export market. Copyright The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / the world bank . All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivan T. Kandilov, 2009. "Do Exporters Pay Higher Wages? Plant-level Evidence from an Export Refund Policy in Chile," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 23(2), pages 269-294, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:23:y:2009:i:2:p:269-294
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/wber/lhp004
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Irene Brambilla & Nicolas Depetris Chauvin & Guido Porto, 2015. "Wage and Employment Gains from Exports: Evidence from Developing Countries," Working Papers 2015-28, CEPII research center.
    2. Jorge Friedman & Nanno Mulder & Sebastián Faúndez & Esteban Pérez Caldentey & Carlos Yévenes & Mario Velásquez & Fernando Baizán & Gerhard Reinecke, 2011. "Openness, Wage Gaps and Unions in Chile: A Micro Econometric Analysis," OECD Trade Policy Papers 134, OECD Publishing.
    3. Alex Coad & Christina Guenther, 2012. "Age, diversification and survival in the German machine tool industry, 1953-2002," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2011-23, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    4. Sushanta Mallick & Yong Yang, 2013. "Productivity Performance of Export Market Entry and Exit: Evidence from Indian Firms," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(4), pages 809-824, September.
    5. Coad, Alex & Segarra, Agustí & Teruel, Mercedes, 2013. "Like milk or wine: Does firm performance improve with age?," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 173-189.
    6. repec:bla:reviec:v:25:y:2017:i:3:p:447-475 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Alex Coad & Christina Guenther, 2013. "Diversification patterns and survival as firms mature," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 633-649, October.
    8. Joachim Wagner, 2012. "International trade and firm performance: a survey of empirical studies since 2006," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 148(2), pages 235-267, June.
    9. repec:eee:quaeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:70-99 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Braymen, Charles B., 2011. "Sectoral structure, heterogeneous plants, and international trade," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 1967-1976, July.
    11. David Greenstreet, 2007. "Exploiting Sequential Learning to Estimate Establishment-Level Productivity Dynamics and Decision Rules," Economics Series Working Papers 345, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:23:y:2009:i:2:p:269-294. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wrldbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.