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R&D Programmes, Policy Mix, and the ‘European Paradox’: Evidence from European SMEs

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  • Dragana Radicic
  • Geoffrey Pugh

Abstract

Using a sample of small and medium-sized enterprises from twenty-eight European countries, this study evaluates the input and output additionality of national and European Union (EU) R&D programmes both separately and in combination. Accordingly, we contribute to understanding the effectiveness of innovation policy from the perspective of policy mix. Empirical results are different for innovation inputs and outputs. For innovation inputs, we found positive treatment effects from national and EU programmes separately as well as complementary effects for firms supported from both sources relative to firms supported only by national programmes. For innovation outputs, we report no evidence of additionality from national programmes and cannot reject crowding out from EU programmes. However, crowding out from EU support is eliminated by combination with national support. These findings have policy implications for the governance of R&D policy and suggest that the European paradox—success in promoting R&D inputs but not commercialisation—is not yet mitigated.

Suggested Citation

  • Dragana Radicic & Geoffrey Pugh, 2017. "R&D Programmes, Policy Mix, and the ‘European Paradox’: Evidence from European SMEs," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(4), pages 497-512.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:scippl:v:44:y:2017:i:4:p:497-512.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/scipol/scw077
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dragana Radicic & Geoffrey Pugh & Hugo Hollanders & René Wintjes & Jon Fairburn, 2016. "The impact of innovation support programs on small and medium enterprises innovation in traditional manufacturing industries: An evaluation for seven European Union regions," Environment and Planning C, , vol. 34(8), pages 1425-1452, December.
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    8. Ben R. Martin, 2016. "R&D policy instruments -- a critical review of what we do and don’t know," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(2), pages 157-176, February.
    9. Marino, Marianna & Lhuillery, Stephane & Parrotta, Pierpaolo & Sala, Davide, 2016. "Additionality or crowding-out? An overall evaluation of public R&D subsidy on private R&D expenditure," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(9), pages 1715-1730.
    10. Wintjes, R. & Douglas, D. & Fairburn, J. & Hollanders, H. & Pugh, G., 2014. "The impact of innovation support programmes on SME innovation in traditional manufacturing industries: an evaluation for seven EU regions," MERIT Working Papers 2014-033, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Cheah & Yuen-Ping Ho, 2019. "Coworking and Sustainable Business Model Innovation in Young Firms," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(10), pages 1-18, May.
    2. Okamuro, Hiroyuki & Nishimura, Junichi, 2019. "Effects of multilevel policy mix of public R&D subsidies: Empirical evidence from Japanese local SMEs," CCES Discussion Paper Series 70, Center for Research on Contemporary Economic Systems, Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Ziesemer, Thomas, 2019. "The effects of R&D subsidies and publicly performed R&D on business R&D: A survey," MERIT Working Papers 2019-036, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    4. Stojčić, Nebojša & Srhoj, Stjepan & Coad, Alex, 2020. "Innovation procurement as capability-building: Evaluating innovation policies in eight Central and Eastern European countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 121(C).
    5. Sonja Radas & Andrea Mervar & Bruno Škrinjarić, 2020. "Regional Perspective on R&D Policies for SMEs: Does Success Breed Success?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(9), pages 1-25, May.

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