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What Have We Learned from Over 20 Years of Farmland Amenity Valuation Research in North America?


  • John C. Bergstrom
  • Richard C. Ready


At least thirty studies have been conducted in North America over the last twenty-plus years that measure amenity values generated by farmland. A review of these studies provides evidence that estimated farmland amenity values are sensitive to increasing acreage, regional scarcity, alternative land use(s), public accessibility, productivity quality, human food plants, active farming, and intensive agriculture. Farmland amenity values are also sensitive to socio-demographic characteristics of beneficiaries. Inconclusive evidence is provided with respect to the effects of distance, agricultural land use, unique landscape features, property rights, and nonfarmland amenity substitutes. Implications of these results for future farmland amenity valuation research are discussed. Copyright 2009, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • John C. Bergstrom & Richard C. Ready, 2009. "What Have We Learned from Over 20 Years of Farmland Amenity Valuation Research in North America?," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 21-49.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:revage:v:31:y:2009:i:1:p:21-49

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Carol G. Johnston & Richard H. James & Jenny N. Lye & Ian M. McDonald, 2000. "An Evaluation of Collaborative Problem Solving for Learning Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 13-29, December.
    2. Scott P. Simkins, 1999. "Promoting Active-Student Learning Using the World Wide Web in Economics Courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 278-287, January.
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    7. Moon, Wanki & Griffith, Jacob Wayne, 2011. "Assessing holistic economic value for multifunctional agriculture in the US," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 455-465, August.
    8. Moon, Wanki, 2012. "Conceptualizing Multifunctional Agriculture from a Global Perspective," 2012 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2012, Birmingham, Alabama 119751, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    9. Moon, Wanki & Chang, Jae Bong & Asirvatham, Jebaraj, 2016. "Identifying Factors Driving US Citizens’ Preferences about Multifunctional Agriculture," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 230032, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    10. Coisnon, Thomas & Oueslati, Walid & Salanié, Julien, 2014. "Urban sprawl occurrence under spatially varying agricultural amenities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 38-49.
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    13. Hom Nath Gartaula & Pashupati Chaudhary & Kamal Khadka, 2014. "Land Redistribution and Reutilization in the Context of Migration in Rural Nepal," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(3), pages 1-16, June.
    14. Moon, Wanki, 2010. "Multifunctional Agriculture, Protectionism, And Prospect Of Trade Liberalization," Journal of Rural Development/Nongchon-Gyeongje, Korea Rural Economic Institute, vol. 33(2), July.
    15. Dayton Lambert & Christopher Clark & Michael Wilcox & Seong-Hoon Cho, 2011. "Distance, density, local amenities, and suburban development preferences in a rapidly growing East Tennessee county," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 28(4), pages 519-532, December.
    16. Waltert, Fabian & Schläpfer, Felix, 2010. "Landscape amenities and local development: A review of migration, regional economic and hedonic pricing studies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 141-152, December.
    17. Duke, Joshua M. & Borchers, Allison M. & Johnston, Robert J. & Absetz, Sarah, 2012. "Sustainable agricultural management contracts: Using choice experiments to estimate the benefits of land preservation and conservation practices," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 95-103.

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