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Estimating the Determinants of Supply of Computing, Problem-Solving, Communication, Social, and Teamworking Skills

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  • Green, Francis
  • Ashton, David
  • Felstead, Alan

Abstract

We investigate the sources of supply of several core skills, using an innovative approach to skills measurement that involves adapting a job analysis methodology and applying it in a survey context. We then estimate the determinants of skills supply using a production function model. The main findings are: (i) prior education and work experience have generally positive but diminishing marginal impacts on skills, consistent with the earnings function literature; (ii) off-the-job training is productive of most types of skill, while on-the-job training is effective for the generation of problem-solving and team-working skills. Both types of training are transferable from previous employers; (iii) more education enhances the development of computing skills at work, but with respect to other core skills, less educated workers make up for their lower education through more work-based learning; and (iv) there is a strong association between the presence of some new or flexible organisation characteristics and both the level and growth of all types of skills. We argue overall that the contribution of work-based learning to skills development is more important than normally allowed for in the skills policy discourse. Copyright 2001 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Green, Francis & Ashton, David & Felstead, Alan, 2001. "Estimating the Determinants of Supply of Computing, Problem-Solving, Communication, Social, and Teamworking Skills," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 406-433, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:53:y:2001:i:3:p:406-33
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Ferreira & Annemarie Künn-Nelen & Andries De Grip, 2017. "Work-Related Learning and Skill Development in Europe: Does Initial Skill Mismatch Matter?," Research in Labor Economics,in: Skill Mismatch in Labor Markets, volume 45, pages 345-407 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    2. Adriaan Zon & Roberto Antonietti, 2016. "Education and training in a model of endogenous growth with creative wear-and-tear," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 33(1), pages 35-62, April.
    3. Destré, Guillaume & Lévy-Garboua, Louis & Sollogoub, Michel, 2008. "Learning from experience or learning from others?: Inferring informal training from a human capital earnings function with matched employer-employee data," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 919-938, June.
    4. Adriaan van Zon & Robert Antonietti, 2004. "On the Role of Education and Training as Drivers of Growth," DEGIT Conference Papers c009_027, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    5. Heijke, J.A.M. & Meng, C.M. & Ramaekers, G.W.M., 2002. "An investigation into the role of human capital competences and their pay-off," ROA Research Memorandum 3E, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    6. Paola Gritti & Riccardo Leoni, 2013. "The impact on wages of generic competencies, psychological capital, new work practices and digital technologies," Working Papers (2013-) 1301, University of Bergamo, Department of Management, Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    7. Léné, Alexandre, 2011. "Occupational downgrading and bumping down: The combined effects of education and experience," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 257-269, April.
    8. Wojciech Szewczyk & Anna Sabadash, 2013. "Macroeconomic Modelling of Public Expenditures on Research and Development in Information and Communication Technologies," JRC Working Papers JRC82943, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    9. Biesma, R.G. & Pavlova, M. & van Merode, G.G. & Groot, W., 2007. "Using conjoint analysis to estimate employers preferences for key competencies of master level Dutch graduates entering the public health field," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 375-386, June.
    10. Guidetti, Giovanni & Mazzanti, Massimiliano, 2007. "Firm-level training in local economic systems: Complementarities in production and firm innovation strategies," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 875-894, December.

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