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Are food safety standards different from other food standards? A political economy perspective

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  • Johan F.M. Swinnen
  • Thijs Vandemoortele

Abstract

This paper uses a political economy model which integrates risk to analyse whether the nature of public food standards [food safety standards, food quality standards, and social and environmental standards] affects the politically optimal level of the standard and the likelihood of trade conflicts. In general, public food safety standards are set at higher levels because stronger consumption effects translate into larger political incentives for governments. The relationship between food standards and protectionism is also affected by the nature of the standards. Oxford University Press and Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics 2009; all rights reserved. For permissions, please email journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Johan F.M. Swinnen & Thijs Vandemoortele, 2009. "Are food safety standards different from other food standards? A political economy perspective," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 36(4), pages 507-523, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:36:y:2009:i:4:p:507-523
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/erae/jbp025
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    Cited by:

    1. Thijs Vandemoortele & Koen Deconinck, 2014. "When Are Private Standards More Stringent than Public Standards?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 96(1), pages 154-171.
    2. Li, Yuan, 2013. "The trade effects, protectionism, and political economy of non-tariff measures," ISU General Staff Papers 201301010800003995, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. John C. Beghin & Miet Maertens & Johan Swinnen, 2017. "Nontariff Measures and Standards in Trade and Global Value Chains," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Nontariff Measures and International Trade, chapter 2, pages 13-38 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    4. Beverelli, Cosimo & Boffa, Mauro & Keck, Alexander, 2014. "Trade policy substitution: Theory and evidence from Specific Trade Concerns," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2014-18, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    5. Meloni, Giulia & Swinnen, Johan, 2013. "The Political Economy of European Wine Regulations," Journal of Wine Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(03), pages 244-284, December.
    6. Subervie, Julie & Vagneron, Isabelle, 2012. "Can Fresh Produce Farmers Benefit from Global Gap Certification? The case of lychee producers in Madagascar," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126704, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Yuan Li & Bo Xiong & John C Beghin, 2017. "The Political Economy of Food Standard Determination: International Evidence from Maximum Residue Limits," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Nontariff Measures and International Trade, chapter 14, pages 239-267 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    8. Johan F.M.Swinnen & Thijs Vandemoortele, 2011. "On Butterflies and Frankenstein: A Dynamic Theory of Regulation," LICOS Discussion Papers 27611, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.

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