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A simple, graphical approach to comparing multiple treatments

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  • Brennan S Thompson
  • Matthew D Webb

Abstract

SummaryWe consider a graphical approach to comparing multiple treatments that allows users to easily infer differences between any treatment effect and zero, and between any pair of treatment effects. This approach makes use of a flexible, resampling-based procedure that asymptotically controls the familywise error rate (the probability of making one or more spurious inferences). We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach with three empirical examples.

Suggested Citation

  • Brennan S Thompson & Matthew D Webb, 2019. "A simple, graphical approach to comparing multiple treatments," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 22(2), pages 188-205.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:emjrnl:v:22:y:2019:i:2:p:188-205.
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