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Beliefs About Other-Regarding Preferences in a Sequential Public Goods Game

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  • Jennifer C. Coats
  • William S. Neilson

Abstract

Experimental evidence is used to deduce players' beliefs about their opponents' concern for others. The experiment is a sequential public good provision game with a provision point and two different refund rules. A theory is constructed to show how early contributions should change with the refund rule depending on the first mover's beliefs about subsequent players' other-regarding preferences. The evidence rejects the hypothesis that early players believe that their opponents are inequality averse and also rejects the hypothesis that early players are concerned with security. The evidence is consistent with beliefs in spite, reciprocity, or a concern for security. (JEL H41, C90, D63, D64) Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Jennifer C. Coats & William S. Neilson, 2005. "Beliefs About Other-Regarding Preferences in a Sequential Public Goods Game," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 43(3), pages 614-622, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:43:y:2005:i:3:p:614-622
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/ei/cbi042
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Sefton & Robert Shupp & James M. Walker, 2007. "The Effect Of Rewards And Sanctions In Provision Of Public Goods," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(4), pages 671-690, October.
    2. Bernd Hayo & Björn Vollan, 2009. "Individual Heterogeneity, Group Interaction, and Co-operative Behaviour: Evidence from a Common-Pool Resource Experiment in South Africa and Namibia," MAGKS Papers on Economics 200917, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    3. Nakamura, Yasuhiko, 2015. "Price versus quantity in a mixed duopoly: The case of relative profit maximization," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 37-43.
    4. Matsumura, Toshihiro & Matsushima, Noriaki & Cato, Susumu, 2013. "Competitiveness and R&D competition revisited," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 541-547.
    5. Steiger, Eva-Maria & Zultan, Ro'i, 2014. "See no evil: Information chains and reciprocity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 1-12.
    6. Nakamura, Yasuhiko, 2014. "Biased managers as strategic commitment: The relative profit approach," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 230-238.
    7. McEvoy, David & Jones, Michael & McKee, Michael & Talberth, John, 2014. "Incentivizing cooperative agreements for sustainable forest management," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 34-41.
    8. Toshihiro Matsumura & Noriaki Matsushima & Susumu Cato, 2009. "Relative Performance and R&D Competition," ISER Discussion Paper 0752, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    9. David McEvoy, 2010. "Not it: opting out of voluntary coalitions that provide a public good," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 142(1), pages 9-23, January.
    10. Yasuhiko Nakamura, 2015. "Biased Managers as Strategic Commitment in a Mixed Duopoly with Relative Profit-Maximizers," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 323-336, December.
    11. Nakamura, Yasuhiko, 2011. "Bargaining over managerial delegation contracts and merger incentives in an international oligopoly," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 47-61, March.
    12. Roi Zultan & Eva-Maria Steiger, 2011. "See No Evil: Information Chains and Reciprocity in Teams," Working Papers 1108, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    13. Hayo, Bernd & Vollan, Björn, 2012. "Group interaction, heterogeneity, rules, and co-operative behaviour: Evidence from a common-pool resource experiment in South Africa and Namibia," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 9-28.
    14. Coats, Jennifer C. & Gronberg, Timothy J. & Grosskopf, Brit, 2009. "Simultaneous versus sequential public good provision and the role of refunds -- An experimental study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 326-335, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers

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