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Endangered Species and Timber Harvesting: The Case of Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers

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  • Daowei Zhang

Abstract

This article presents a theoretical framework and empirical evidence on the relationship between regulatory uncertainty induced by the possible invasion of an endangered species--the red-cockaded woodpecker (RCW)--and timber harvesting. The results indicate that landowners whose forests are close to a known or perceived RCW habitat have a high propensity to cut timber and use a clear-cut method. These preemptive actions are apparently aimed at destroying potential RCW habitat so that the existing values of their property could be protected from the Endangered Species Act (ESA)--related land use limitations. (JEL D23, K32, Q23, Q28) Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Daowei Zhang, 2004. "Endangered Species and Timber Harvesting: The Case of Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(1), pages 150-165, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:42:y:2004:i:1:p:150-165
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    Cited by:

    1. Ferraro, Paul J. & McIntosh, Craig & Ospina, Monica, 2007. "The effectiveness of the US endangered species act: An econometric analysis using matching methods," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 245-261, November.
    2. Robert Innes & George Frisvold, 2009. "The Economics of Endangered Species," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 485-512, September.
    3. Di Maria, Corrado & Lange, Ian & van der Werf, Edwin, 2014. "Should we be worried about the green paradox? Announcement effects of the Acid Rain Program," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 143-162.
    4. Douglas S. Noonan, 2013. "Market effects of historic preservation," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Cultural Heritage, chapter 17, pages i-i Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. repec:eee:eneeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:320-327 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights
    • K32 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Energy, Environmental, Health, and Safety Law
    • Q23 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Forestry
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy

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