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GIS for Credible Identification Strategies in Economics Research

Author

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  • Masayuki Kudamatsu

Abstract

This article surveys the use of geographic information systems (GIS) for the credible identification of causal impacts in recent economics research. It describes how each geo-processing tool in GIS allows economists to use data on geography and weather as sources of exogenous variation for estimating the impact of various ‘treatments’. The diverse range of treatments discussed in this survey includes disease, school competition, land suitability for agriculture, infrastructure, the elasticity of housing supply, mass media, learning from friends, slave trade, the appropriability of crop harvests, and terrain ruggedness.

Suggested Citation

  • Masayuki Kudamatsu, 2018. "GIS for Credible Identification Strategies in Economics Research," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 64(2), pages 327-338.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cesifo:v:64:y:2018:i:2:p:327-338.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cesifo/ifx026
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Junichi Yamasaki, 2017. "Railroads, Technology Adoption, and Modern Economic Development: Evidence from Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 1000, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    2. Nathan Nunn & Nancy Qian, 2011. "The Potato's Contribution to Population and Urbanization: Evidence From A Historical Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(2), pages 593-650.
    3. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2007. "Using Global Positioning Systems in Household Surveys for Better Economics and Better Policy," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 22(2), pages 217-241, September.
    4. Taryn Dinkelman, 2011. "The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3078-3108, December.
    5. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    6. Rebecca Diamond, 2016. "The Determinants and Welfare Implications of US Workers' Diverging Location Choices by Skill: 1980-2000," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(3), pages 479-524, March.
    7. repec:hrv:faseco:33077825 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Arnaud Costinot & Dave Donaldson & Cory Smith, 2016. "Evolving Comparative Advantage and the Impact of Climate Change in Agricultural Markets: Evidence from 1.7 Million Fields around the World," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(1), pages 205-248.
    9. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2007. "Using Global Positioning Systems in Household Surveys for Better Economics and Better Policy," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 22(2), pages 217-241, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stefano CLÒ & Massimo FLORIO & Valentina MORRETTA & Davide VURCHIO, 2019. "Earth Observation in a Cost-Benefit Analysis Perspective: Cosmo SkyMed Satellites of the Italian Space Agency," Departmental Working Papers 2019-06, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    econometric and statistical methods; economic development;

    JEL classification:

    • C88 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Other Computer Software
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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