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Estimating Local Redistribution Through Property-Tax-Funded Public School Systems

Author

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  • Kurban, Haydar
  • Gallagher, Ryan M.
  • Persky, Joseph J.

Abstract

Local intra-suburban heterogeneity implies the possibility of redistribution through local public taxes and expenditures, yet there are no studies of the extent of such transfers. This paper provides evidence that local redistribution in the property-tax-financed school systems in suburban Chicago is substantial, amounting to $2.3 billion or two-thirds of property-tax-financed school expenditures. Most of those transfers flow from households with no children enrolled in local public schools to those with children in the local public schools, rather than from households with high-value homes to those with lower-valued homes.

Suggested Citation

  • Kurban, Haydar & Gallagher, Ryan M. & Persky, Joseph J., 2012. "Estimating Local Redistribution Through Property-Tax-Funded Public School Systems," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 65(3), pages 629-651, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:65:y:2012:i:3:p:629-51
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sandra E. Black, 1999. "Do Better Schools Matter? Parental Valuation of Elementary Education," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 577-599.
    2. Patrick Bayer & Fernando Ferreira & Robert McMillan, 2007. "A Unified Framework for Measuring Preferences for Schools and Neighborhoods," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(4), pages 588-638, August.
    3. Downes, Thomas A. & Zabel, Jeffrey E., 2002. "The impact of school characteristics on house prices: Chicago 1987-1991," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 1-25, July.
    4. Farnham, Martin & Sevak, Purvi, 2006. "State fiscal institutions and empty-nest migration: Are Tiebout voters hobbled?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(3), pages 407-427, February.
    5. Brunner, Eric & Balsdon, Ed, 2004. "Intergenerational conflict and the political economy of school spending," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 369-388, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Bucciol & Laura Cavalli & Paolo Pertile & Veronica Polin & Alessandro Sommacal, 2016. "Redistribution at the local level: the case of public childcare in Italy," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 63(4), pages 359-378, December.
    2. Zodrow, George R., 2014. "Intrajurisdictional capitalization and the incidence of the property tax," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 57-66.
    3. Gallagher, Ryan M., 2016. "The fiscal externality of multifamily housing and its impact on the property tax: Evidence from cities and schools, 1980–2010," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 249-259.
    4. Gallagher, Ryan M. & Kurban, Haydar & Persky, Joseph J., 2013. "Small homes, public schools, and property tax capitalization," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 422-428.
    5. repec:eee:regeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:150-174 is not listed on IDEAS

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