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Gray Peril or Loyal Support? The Effects of the Elderly on Educational Expenditures-super-

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  • Michael B. Berkman
  • Eric Plutzer

Abstract

Do large concentrations of elderly represent a "gray peril" to maintaining adequate educational expenditures? The gray peril hypothesis is based on an assumption of instrumental self-interest in political behavior. In contrast, we argue that "loyalty" to community schools competes with economic self-interest and that older citizens are heterogeneous in their preferences. Copyright (c) 2004 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

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  • Michael B. Berkman & Eric Plutzer, 2004. "Gray Peril or Loyal Support? The Effects of the Elderly on Educational Expenditures-super-," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1178-1192.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:85:y:2004:i:5:p:1178-1192
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    Cited by:

    1. Cattaneo, M. Alejandra & Wolter, Stefan C., 2009. "Are the elderly a threat to educational expenditures?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 225-236, June.
    2. Dayton M. Lambert & Christopher D. Clark & Michael D. Wilcox & William M. Park, 2009. "Public Education Financing Trends and the Gray Peril Hypothesis," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(4), pages 619-648.
    3. Luiz Mello & Simone Schotte & Erwin R. Tiongson & Hernan Winkler, 2017. "Greying the Budget: Ageing and Preferences over Public Policies," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(1), pages 70-96, February.
    4. Figlio, David N. & Fletcher, Deborah, 2012. "Suburbanization, demographic change and the consequences for school finance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(11), pages 1144-1153.
    5. Matthew J. Burbank & Daniel Levin, 2015. "Community Attachment and Voting for School Vouchers," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1169-1177, November.
    6. Jason Giersch, 2014. "Effects of vacation properties on local education budgets," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 1-9, December.
    7. Brunner, Eric J. & Johnson, Erik B., 2016. "Intergenerational conflict and the political economy of higher education funding," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 73-87.
    8. Saito, Hitoshi, 2017. "The effects of population ageing on public education in Japan : A reinterpretation using micro data," MPRA Paper 79848, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_381 is not listed on IDEAS

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