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Greying the budget : ageing and preferences over public policies

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  • de Mello,Luiz
  • Schotte,Simone Raphaela
  • Tiongson,Erwin H. R.
  • Winkler,Hernan Jorge

Abstract

This paper looks at how individual preferences for the allocation of government spending change along the life cycle. Using the Life in Transition Survey II for 34 countries in Europe and Central Asia, the study finds that older individuals are less likely to support a rise in government outlays on education and more likely to support increases in spending on pensions. These results are very similar across countries, and they do not change when using alternative model specifications, estimation methods, and data sources. Using repeated cross-sections, the analysis controls for cohort effects and confirms the main results. The findings are consistent with a body of literature arguing that conflict across generations over the allocation of public expenditures may intensify in ageing economies.

Suggested Citation

  • de Mello,Luiz & Schotte,Simone Raphaela & Tiongson,Erwin H. R. & Winkler,Hernan Jorge, 2016. "Greying the budget : ageing and preferences over public policies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7555, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7555
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. David J. McKenzie, 2006. "Disentangling Age, Cohort and Time Effects in the Additive Model," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(4), pages 473-495, August.
    6. Brunner, Eric J. & Ross, Stephen L., 2010. "Is the median voter decisive? Evidence from referenda voting patterns," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(11-12), pages 898-910, December.
    7. Breyer, Friedrich & Craig, Ben, 1997. "Voting on social security: Evidence from OECD countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 705-724, December.
    8. Sam Schulhofer-Wohl, 2012. "The Age-Time-Cohort Problem and the Identification of Structural Parameters in Life-Cycle Models," 2012 Meeting Papers 575, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Poterba, James M, 1998. "Demographic Change, Intergenerational Linkages, and Public Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 315-320, May.
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    12. Deborah Fletcher & Lawrence W. Kenny, 2008. "The Influence of the Elderly on School Spending in a Median Voter Framework," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 3(3), pages 283-315, July.
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    14. Walter O. Simmons & Rosemarie Emanuele, 2004. "Does Government Spending Crowd Out Donations of Time and Money?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 32(5), pages 498-511, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Saastamoinen, Antti & Kortelainen, Mika, 2018. "When does money stick in education? Evidence from a kinked grant rule," Working Papers 102, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Lee, R., 2016. "Macroeconomics, Aging, and Growth," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, Elsevier.
    3. Ann Barbara Bauer & Reiner Eichenberger, 2018. "Worsening Workers' Health by Lowering Retirement Age: The Malign Consequences of a Benign Reform," CREMA Working Paper Series 2018-02, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Youth and Governance; Social Analysis; Public Finance Decentralization and Poverty Reduction; Economic Adjustment and Lending; National Governance; Quality of Life&Leisure; Public Sector Economics; Macro-Fiscal Policy; Government Policies;

    JEL classification:

    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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