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Structural Change in the Research and Experimentation Tax Credit: Success or Failure?

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  • Gupta, Sanjay
  • Hwang, Yuhchang
  • Schmidt, Andrew P.

Abstract

This study examines the availability and incentive effects of the Research and Experimentation tax credit following structural changes in the computation of the credit enacted in the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989 (OBRA89). We find that overall firm eligibility declined after OBRA89, but eligibility increased for firms in high-tech industries, relative to firms in other industries. Dynamic panel regressions indicate that median research and development spending intensity of high-tech (other) firms increased by approximately 15.9 (9.4) percent from 1986–1989 to 1990–1994. For firms that qualified for the credit, our estimates imply approximately $2.08 of additional research and development spending per dollar of revenue forgone.

Suggested Citation

  • Gupta, Sanjay & Hwang, Yuhchang & Schmidt, Andrew P., 2011. "Structural Change in the Research and Experimentation Tax Credit: Success or Failure?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 64(2), pages 285-322, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:64:y:2011:i:2:p:285-322
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
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    5. Myers, Stewart C. & Majluf, Nicolás S., 1945-, 1984. "Corporate financing and investment decisions when firms have information that investors do not have," Working papers 1523-84., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    6. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
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    Cited by:

    1. William Gale & Samuel Brown, 2013. "Small Business, Innovation, and Tax Policy: A Review," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 66(4), pages 871-892, December.
    2. Rao, Nirupama, 2016. "Do tax credits stimulate R&D spending? The effect of the R&D tax credit in its first decade," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 1-12.

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