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Equity, Institutions and the Development Process

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  • James A. Robinson

    (Harvard University)

Abstract

In this essay I argue that to develop institutions that promote economic development societies must be equitable in fundamental ways. I particularly emphasize how important an equitable distribution of political power in society is to have well functioning institutions that support market activities. I show these ideas are consistent with broad patterns in the cross-national data and country case studies.

Suggested Citation

  • James A. Robinson, 2006. "Equity, Institutions and the Development Process," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 32, pages 17-50.
  • Handle: RePEc:noj:journl:v:32:y:2006:p:17-50
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Daron Acemoglu & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Why Did the West Extend the Franchise? Democracy, Inequality, and Growth in Historical Perspective," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1167-1199.
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    Cited by:

    1. Iván Gachet & Diego F. Grijalva & Paúl Ponce & Damián Rodríguez, 2016. "Vertical and horizontal inequality in Ecuador: The lack of sustainability," WIDER Working Paper Series 106, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Pedro Funari, 2016. "Institutions, Inequality, And Long-Term Development: A Perspective From Brazilian Regions," Anais do XLII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 42nd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 019, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    3. Bhattacharyya, Sambit, 2009. "Institutions, diseases, and economic progress: a unified framework," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(01), pages 65-87, April.

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