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Product Switching and Firm Performance in Japan - Empirical Analysis Based on the Census of Manufacturers

Author

Listed:
  • Atsushi Kawakami

    (Associate Professor, Global Exchange Office for Research and Education, Gakushuin University)

  • Tsutomu Miyagawa

    (Professor, Faculty of Economics, Gakushuin University)

Abstract

Following Bernard, Redding and Schott (2010), we have constructed product and firm level data on Japanese manufacturing firms using the Census of Manufacturers. Our empirical analysis based on the constructed data shows that multiple-product firms perform better than single-product firms and their labor productivity growth rates are higher. Empirical studies at the industry level show that an unregulated, competitive environment stimulates product switching. At the firm level, product switching behavior improves firm performance, including employment, while the firms that reduce the number of their products see a decline in labor productivity, due to output reduction exceeding the magnitude of the reduction in employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Atsushi Kawakami & Tsutomu Miyagawa, 2013. "Product Switching and Firm Performance in Japan - Empirical Analysis Based on the Census of Manufacturers," Public Policy Review, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan, vol. 9(2), pages 287-314, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:mof:journl:ppr021b
    as

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    File URL: http://www.mof.go.jp/english/pri/publication/pp_review/ppr021/ppr021b.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nishimura, Kiyohiko G. & Nakajima, Takanobu & Kiyota, Kozo, 2005. "Does the natural selection mechanism still work in severe recessions?: Examination of the Japanese economy in the 1990s," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 53-78, September.
    2. Andrew B. Bernard & Stephen J. Redding & Peter K. Schott, 2003. "Product Choice and Product Switching," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm381, Yale School of Management.
    3. Kyoji Fukao & Hyeog Ug Kwon, 2006. "Why Did Japan'S Tfp Growth Slow Down In The Lost Decade? An Empirical Analysis Based On Firm-Level Data Of Manufacturing Firms," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 57(2), pages 195-228.
    4. Carol Newman & John Rand & Finn Tarp, 2007. "Sector Switching: An Unexplored Dimension of Firm Dynamics in Developing Countries," Trinity Economics Papers tep1007, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    5. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1982. "Selection and the Evolution of Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(3), pages 649-670, May.
    6. Jose Manuel Campa & Simi Kedia, 2002. "Explaining the Diversification Discount," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(4), pages 1731-1762, August.
    7. Greenaway, David & Gullstrand, Joakim & Kneller, Richard, 2008. "Surviving globalisation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 264-277, March.
    8. Fariñas, Jose C. & Ruano, Sonia, 2005. "Firm productivity, heterogeneity, sunk costs and market selection," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 23(7-8), pages 505-534, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entry; Exit; Multiple-Product Firm; Product Switching; Labor Productivity; TFP CPropensity Score Matching Model;

    JEL classification:

    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L21 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Business Objectives of the Firm
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General

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