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The Government and Market Expectations


  • Roger Guesnerie


The paper discusses the concept of 'expectational market failures'; it attempts to assess the scope for Government intervention aiming at stabilizing economic agents' expectations. The rational-expectations hypothesis, 'evolutive' and 'eductive' learning, credibility, 'indicative planning', financial crisis, 'knowledge failure' are some of the key words of the discussion.

Suggested Citation

  • Roger Guesnerie, 2001. "The Government and Market Expectations," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 157(1), pages 116-116, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:mhr:jinste:urn:sici:0932-4569(200103)157:1_116:tgame_2.0.tx_2-p

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Guesnerie, Roger, 1992. "An Exploration of the Eductive Justifications of the Rational-Expectations Hypothesis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1254-1278, December.
    2. Bernheim, B Douglas, 1984. "Rationalizable Strategic Behavior," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(4), pages 1007-1028, July.
    3. Chiappori, Pierre Andre & Guesnerie, Roger, 1991. "Sunspot equilibria in sequential markets models," Handbook of Mathematical Economics,in: W. Hildenbrand & H. Sonnenschein (ed.), Handbook of Mathematical Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 32, pages 1683-1762 Elsevier.
    4. Cass, David & Shell, Karl, 1983. "Do Sunspots Matter?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 193-227, April.
    5. Jean-Michel Grandmont, 1998. "Expectations Formation and Stability of Large Socioeconomic Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(4), pages 741-782, July.
    6. William Fellner, 1979. "The Credibility Effect and Rational Expectations: Implications of the Gramlich Study," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 10(1), pages 167-190.
    7. Azariadis, Costas, 1981. "Self-fulfilling prophecies," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 380-396, December.
    8. Dierker, Egbert, 1972. "Two Remarks on the Number of Equilibria of an Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 40(5), pages 951-953, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gomes, Orlando, 2009. "Stability under learning: The endogenous growth problem," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 807-816, September.

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    JEL classification:

    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government


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