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Identification-Robust Minimum Distance Estimation of the New Keynesian Phillips Curve




Limited-information identification-robust methods on the indexation and price rigidity parameters of the New Keynesian Phillips Curve yield very wide confidence intervals. Full-information methods impose more restrictions on the reduced-form dynamics and thus make more efficient use of the information in the data. However, such methods are also subject to weak instrument problems. We propose identification-robust minimum distance methods for exploiting these additional restrictions and show that they yield considerably smaller confidence intervals for the coefficients of the model compared to their limited-information generalized method of moments counterparts. In contrast to previous studies, we find evidence of partial but not full indexation, and obtain sharper inference on the degree of price stickiness. However, this parameter remains weakly identified. Copyright (c) 2010 The Ohio State University.

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  • Leandro M. Magnusson & Sophocles Mavroeidis, 2010. "Identification-Robust Minimum Distance Estimation of the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(2-3), pages 465-481, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:42:y:2010:i:2-3:p:465-481

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sophocles Mavroeidis & Mikkel Plagborg-Møller & James H. Stock, 2014. "Empirical Evidence on Inflation Expectations in the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 124-188, March.
    2. Antonio Diez de Los Rios, 2015. "A New Linear Estimator for Gaussian Dynamic Term Structure Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 282-295, April.
    3. Dufour, Jean-Marie & Khalaf, Lynda & Kichian, Maral, 2013. "Identification-robust analysis of DSGE and structural macroeconomic models," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 340-350.
    4. Kapetanios, George & Khalaf, Lynda & Marcellino, Massimiliano, 2015. "Factor based identification-robust inference in IV regressions," CEPR Discussion Papers 10390, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Hyeongwoo Kim & Ippei Fujiwara & Bruce E. Hansen & Masao Ogaki, 2015. "Purchasing Power Parity and the Taylor Rule," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(6), pages 874-903, September.
    6. repec:taf:emetrv:v:35:y:2016:i:7:p:1251-1270 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Mariano Kulish & Adrian Pagan, 2016. "Issues in Estimating New Keynesian Phillips Curves in the Presence of Unknown Structural Change," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(7), pages 1251-1270, August.
    8. Krogh, Tord S., 2015. "Macro frictions and theoretical identification of the New Keynesian Phillips curve," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 191-204.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation


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