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From laboratory to market: on the propensity of young inventors to form a new business

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  • Albert Link

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  • Dianne Welsh

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Abstract

Many researchers have studied correlates of business formation. Through the case-based and statistical literature, several broad categories of influence on the entrepreneurial decision to start a new business have been identified. We contribute to this literature through statistical analysis of a unique database of young inventive scientists and engineers and their propensity toward new business formation. Our particular focus is on young inventors starting a business based on their creative achievements. Among this group, we do not find empirical support for the influence of traditional variables such as age, education, and gender on the propensity to start a new business. Rather, we find that their entrepreneurial experience as a new business proprietor is driven by dimensions of their university laboratory research experience. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Albert Link & Dianne Welsh, 2013. "From laboratory to market: on the propensity of young inventors to form a new business," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 1-7, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:40:y:2013:i:1:p:1-7 DOI: 10.1007/s11187-011-9345-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blanchflower, David G & Oswald, Andrew J, 1998. "What Makes an Entrepreneur?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 26-60, January.
    2. Fairlie, Robert W, 1999. "The Absence of the African-American Owned Business: An Analysis of the Dynamics of Self-Employment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(1), pages 80-108, January.
    3. Robinson, Peter B. & Sexton, Edwin A., 1994. "The effect of education and experience on self-employment success," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 141-156, March.
    4. Borjas, George J & Bronars, Stephen G, 1989. "Consumer Discrimination and Self-employment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(3), pages 581-605, June.
    5. Roope Uusitalo, 2001. "Homo entreprenaurus?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(13), pages 1631-1638.
    6. Bernard F. Lentz & David N. Laband, 1990. "Entrepreneurial Success and Occupational Inheritance among Proprietors," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 23(3), pages 563-579, August.
    7. George J. Borjas, 1986. "The Self-Employment Experience of Immigrants," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(4), pages 485-506.
    8. Blanchflower, David G & Meyer, Bruce D, 1994. "A Longitudinal Analysis of the Young Self-Employed in Australia and the United States," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 1-19, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Audretsch & Erik Lehmann & Stefano Paleari, 2015. "Academic policy and entrepreneurship: a European perspective," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 363-368, June.
    2. Jörn H. Block & Andreas Landgraf, 2016. "Transition from part-time entrepreneurship to full-time entrepreneurship: the role of financial and non-financial motives," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 259-282, March.
    3. Bradley, Samantha R. & Gicheva, Dora & Hassell, Lydia & Link, Albert N., 2013. "Gender Differences in Access to Private Investment Funding to Support the Development of New Technologies," UNCG Economics Working Papers 13-9, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    4. Giorgio Calcagnini & Germana Giombini & Paolo Liberati & Giuseppe Travaglini, 2016. "A matching model of university–industry collaborations," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 31-43, January.
    5. Zoltán J. Ács & Pontus Braunerhjelm & David B. Audretsch & Bo Carlsson, 2015. "The knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship," Chapters,in: Global Entrepreneurship, Institutions and Incentives, chapter 7, pages 129-144 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Dora Gicheva & Albert Link, 2013. "Leveraging entrepreneurship through private investments: does gender matter?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 199-210, February.
    7. David Audretsch & Maksim Belitski, 2013. "The missing pillar: the creativity theory of knowledge spillover entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 819-836, December.
    8. Dennis Patrick Leyden, 2016. "Universities as partners in research joint ventures," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 43(4), pages 449-462, December.
    9. Dennis Leyden & Albert Link, 2013. "Knowledge spillovers, collective entrepreneurship, and economic growth: the role of universities," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 797-817, December.
    10. E. Carayannis & E. Grigoroudis, 2014. "Linking innovation, productivity, and competitiveness: implications for policy and practice," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 199-218, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entrepreneurship; Business formation; Patents; L26;

    JEL classification:

    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

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