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The day-of-the-week effect in conditional correlation

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  • Mahendra Chandra

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Abstract

The day-of-the-week effect in the first and second moments of the return distribution is a well researched area. However, not many studies have attempted to identify this effect in the comovement or correlation of the markets. This paper models the day-of-the-week effect in the returns and the conditional correlation for some Asia-Pacific equity markets. The paper finds a Monday, Wednesday and Friday effects in the returns for some of the markets. The effect is totally absent in the returns for Australia, Japan and Korea. For the fifteen conditional correlation series estimated, a predominant Tuesday effect is detected for five series. Three series exhibit a Monday effect. A Thursday effect is detected between the Singapore market and the markets of Australia, Hong Kong and Thailand. The paper finds no consistent day-of-the-week effect in the returns and the correlations for this region. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2006

Suggested Citation

  • Mahendra Chandra, 2006. "The day-of-the-week effect in conditional correlation," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 297-310, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:rqfnac:v:27:y:2006:i:3:p:297-310
    DOI: 10.1007/s11156-006-9433-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Büttner, David & Hayo, Bernd, 2010. "News and correlations of CEEC-3 financial markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 915-922, September.
    2. Farag, Hisham, 2013. "Price limit bands, asymmetric volatility and stock market anomalies: Evidence from emerging markets," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 85-97.
    3. Denise R. Osborn & Christos S. Savva & Len Gill, 2008. "Periodic Dynamic Conditional Correlations between Stock Markets in Europe and the US," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 6(3), pages 307-325, Summer.
    4. Rayenda Khresna Brahmana & Chee-Wooi Hooy & Zamri Ahmad, 2012. "Psychological factors on irrational financial decision making: Case of day-of-the week anomaly," Humanomics: The International Journal of Systems and Ethics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(4), pages 236-257, October.
    5. Shieldvie Halim & Rayenda Brahmana & Aldrin Herwany, 2011. "The Seasonality of Market Integration: The Case of Indonesia’s Stock Markets," Economics and Finance in Indonesia, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Indonesia, vol. 59, pages 177-190, August.

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