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The effect of parental labor supply on child schooling: evidence from trade liberalization in India

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  • Beyza Ural Marchand

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  • Ray Rees

    ()

  • Raymond Riezman

    ()

Abstract

This paper estimates the effect of changes in maternal and paternal labor supply on the schooling rates of children in India using the variation in industry-specific tariffs during a period of trade liberalization. The results show that an increase in maternal labor supplied outside of the household leads to a higher schooling probability for younger children. Specifically, a 1 day per week increase in maternal labor supply is associated with an approximately 5 % points increase in the schooling probability for children between the ages of 7 and 10. However, father’s labor supply has an insignificant effect on child schooling across all specifications. The effect for older children between the ages of 11 and 14, who face a tradeoff between schooling, market work, and domestic work, is also found to be insignificant. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Beyza Ural Marchand & Ray Rees & Raymond Riezman, 2013. "The effect of parental labor supply on child schooling: evidence from trade liberalization in India," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 151-173, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:11:y:2013:i:2:p:151-173
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-013-9175-z
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    Cited by:

    1. Shreyasee Das & Abhilasha Singh, 2013. "The Impact of Temporary Work Guarantee Programs on Children's Education: Evidence from the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Guarantee Act from India," Working Papers 13-03, UW-Whitewater, Department of Economics.
    2. Li, Jie, 2021. "Women hold up half the sky? Trade specialization patterns and work-related gender norms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C).
    3. Janssens, Charlotte & Van den Broeck, Goedele & Maertens, Miet & Lambrecht, Isabel, 2018. "Mothers’ non-farm entrepreneurship and child secondary education in rural Ghana:," IFPRI discussion papers 1705, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child schooling; Labor supply; Trade liberalization; India; D13; J13; O12; O19;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations

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