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An econometric analysis of counterterrorism effectiveness: the impact on life and property losses

Author

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  • Konstantinos Drakos

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  • Nicholas Giannakopoulos

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Konstantinos Drakos & Nicholas Giannakopoulos, 2009. "An econometric analysis of counterterrorism effectiveness: the impact on life and property losses," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 139(1), pages 135-151, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:139:y:2009:i:1:p:135-151
    DOI: 10.1007/s11127-008-9384-9
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11127-008-9384-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Atkinson, Scott E & Sandler, Todd & Tschirhart, John, 1987. "Terrorism in a Bargaining Framework," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 1-21, April.
    2. Grace Sanico & Makoto Kakinaka, 2008. "Terrorism And Deterrence Policy With Transnational Support," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 153-167.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Olaf J. de Groot & Cathérine Müller, 2011. "Highlighting the Major Trade-Offs Concerning Anti-Terrorism Policies," EUSECON Policy Briefing 3, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Freytag, Andreas & Krüger, Jens J. & Meierrieks, Daniel & Schneider, Friedrich, 2011. "The origins of terrorism: Cross-country estimates of socio-economic determinants of terrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(S1), pages 5-16.
    3. Christos Kallandranis & Konstantinos Drakos & Nicholas Giannakopoulos, 2012. "Counterterrorism Effectiveness: The Impact on Life and Property Losses," EUSECON Policy Briefing 19, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Daniel Arce & Sneha Bakshi & Rachel Croson & Catherine Eckel & Enrique Fatas & Malcolm Kass, 2011. "Counterterrorism strategies in the lab," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 465-478, December.
    5. repec:spr:scient:v:101:y:2014:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1378-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kerim Peren ARIN & Otto. F. REICH & Oliver LORZ & Nicola SPAGNOLO, "undated". "Understanding Homeland Security: Theory and UK Evidence," EcoMod2010 259600011, EcoMod.
    7. Konstantinos Drakos, 2011. "Security Economics: A Guide For Data Availability And Needs," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 147-159.
    8. Mubashra, Sana & Shafi, Mariuam i, 2018. "The Impact of Counter-terrorism Effectiveness on Economic Growth of Pakistan: An Econometric Analysis," MPRA Paper 84847, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Eric van Um & Daniela Pisoiu, 2011. "Effective Counterterrorism: What Have We Learned so Far?," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 55, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    10. repec:diw:diwdiw:diwepb19 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Friedrich Schneider & Tilman Brück & Daniel Meierrieks, 2015. "The Economics Of Counterterrorism: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(1), pages 131-157, February.
    12. Economou Athina & Kollias Christos, 2015. "Terrorism and Political Self-Placement in European Union Countries," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 21(2), pages 217-238, April.
    13. Peren Arin, K. & Lorz, Oliver & Reich, Otto F.M. & Spagnolo, Nicola, 2011. "Exploring the dynamics between terrorism and anti-terror spending: Theory and UK-evidence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 189-202, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Counterterrorism; Discrete choice models; Transnational terrorism; C25; F51; H56;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War

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