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Between- and within-group wage inequalities, and the advent of new technology

Author

Listed:
  • Atsushi Miyake

    ()

  • Kazunobu Muro

    ()

  • Tamotsu Nakamura

    ()

  • Masaya Yasuoka

    ()

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Atsushi Miyake & Kazunobu Muro & Tamotsu Nakamura & Masaya Yasuoka, 2009. "Between- and within-group wage inequalities, and the advent of new technology," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 7(4), pages 387-394, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jecinq:v:7:y:2009:i:4:p:387-394
    DOI: 10.1007/s10888-008-9091-2
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10888-008-9091-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Machin, Stephen, 1996. "Wage Inequality in the UK," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 47-64, Spring.
    2. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    3. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2007. "Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(1), pages 118-133, February.
    4. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Melissa S. Kearney, 2006. "The Polarization of the U.S. Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 189-194, May.
    5. Jürgen Meckl & Stefan Zink, 2004. "Solow and heterogeneous labour: a neoclassical explanation of wage inequality," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(498), pages 825-843, October.
    6. Philippe Aghion, 2002. "Schumpeterian Growth Theory and the Dynamics of Income Inequality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(3), pages 855-882, May.
    7. Francesco Caselli, 1999. "Technological Revolutions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 78-102, March.
    8. Daron Acemoglu, 2002. "Directed Technical Change," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 781-809.
    9. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
    10. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer, 1998. "Ability Biased Technological Transition, Wage Inequality and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1972, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Masashi Tanaka, 2013. "Human Capital Investment, Credentialing, and Wage Differentials," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 13-31-Rev., Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Aug 2017.
    2. Masaya Yasuoka & Minoru Hayashida, 2015. "How should a government finance redistribution policies?," Discussion Paper Series 136, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Oct 2015.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Between-group inequality; Within-group inequality; Occupational choice; D31; E20; J31;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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