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Corporate Environmental Responsibility in Polluting Industries: Does Religion Matter?

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Listed:
  • Xingqiang Du

    ()

  • Wei Jian

    ()

  • Quan Zeng

    ()

  • Yingjie Du

    ()

Abstract

Using a sample of Chinese listed firms in polluting industries for the period of 2008–2010, we empirically investigate whether and how Buddhism, China’s most influential religion, affects corporate environmental responsibility (CER). In this study, we measure Buddhist variables as the number of Buddhist monasteries within a certain radius around Chinese listed firms’ registered addresses. In addition, we hand-collect corporate environmental disclosure scores based on the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability reporting guidelines. Using hand-collected Buddhism data and corporate environmental disclosure scores, we provide strong and robust evidence that Buddhism is significantly positively associated with CER. This finding is consistent with the following view: Buddhism can serve as social norms to evoke the consciousness of social responsibility, and thereof strengthen CER. Our findings also reveal that the positive association between Buddhism and CER is attenuated for firms with higher law enforcement index. The results are robust to various measures of Buddhism and a variety of sensitivity tests. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Xingqiang Du & Wei Jian & Quan Zeng & Yingjie Du, 2014. "Corporate Environmental Responsibility in Polluting Industries: Does Religion Matter?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 124(3), pages 485-507, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:124:y:2014:i:3:p:485-507
    DOI: 10.1007/s10551-013-1888-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Davide Forcella & Marek Hudon, 2016. "Green Microfinance in Europe," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 135(3), pages 445-459, May.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:575-:d:95364 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:kap:jbuset:v:143:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10551-015-2758-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. X. H. Meng & S. X. Zeng & X. M. Xie & G. Y. Qi, 2016. "The impact of product market competition on corporate environmental responsibility," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 267-291, March.
    5. repec:eee:eneeco:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:539-547 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:kap:jbuset:v:142:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10551-015-2705-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Xingqiang Du & Yingjie Du & Quan Zeng & Hongmei Pei & Yingying Chang, 2016. "Religious atmosphere, law enforcement, and corporate social responsibility: Evidence from China," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 229-265, March.
    8. Xingqiang Du, 2016. "Does Confucianism Reduce Board Gender Diversity? Firm-Level Evidence from China," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 136(2), pages 399-436, June.
    9. repec:kap:jbuset:v:145:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10551-015-2833-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:12:p:2260-:d:121850 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Subramaniam Ananthram & Christopher Chan, 2016. "Religiosity, spirituality and ethical decision-making: Perspectives from executives in Indian multinational enterprises," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 843-880, September.
    12. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1756-:d:113552 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Xingqiang Du & Yingying Chang & Quan Zeng & Yingjie Du & Hongmei Pei, 2016. "Corporate environmental responsibility (CER) weakness, media coverage, and corporate philanthropy: Evidence from China," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 551-581, June.

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