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Third-party manipulation of conflict: an experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Piotr Evdokimov

    () (ITAM)

  • Umberto Garfagnini

    (University of Surrey)

Abstract

Abstract We design a laboratory experiment in which an interested third party endowed with private information sends a public message to two conflicting players, who then make their choices. We find that third-party communication is not strategic. Nevertheless, a hawkish message by a third party makes hawkish behavior more likely while a dovish message makes it less likely. Moreover, how subjects respond to the message is largely unaffected by the third party’s incentives. We argue that our results are consistent with a focal point interpretation in the spirit of Schelling.

Suggested Citation

  • Piotr Evdokimov & Umberto Garfagnini, 2018. "Third-party manipulation of conflict: an experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(1), pages 27-49, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:expeco:v:21:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10683-017-9523-6
    DOI: 10.1007/s10683-017-9523-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Philip J. Grossman & Youngseok Park & Jean Paul Rabanal & Olga A. Rud, 2019. "Gender differences in an endogenous timing conflict game," Working Papers 141, Peruvian Economic Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Third-party communication; Experiment; Conflict game;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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