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Experts with a conflict of interest: a source of ambiguity?

  • Douglas Norton
  • R. Isaac


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Article provided by Springer & Economic Science Association in its journal Experimental Economics.

Volume (Year): 15 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 260-277

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Handle: RePEc:kap:expeco:v:15:y:2012:i:2:p:260-277
DOI: 10.1007/s10683-011-9299-z
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  1. Itzhak Gilboa & David Schmeidler, 1989. "Maxmin Expected Utility with Non-Unique Prior," Post-Print hal-00753237, HAL.
  2. Chow, Clare Chua & Sarin, Rakesh K, 2001. "Comparative Ignorance and the Ellsberg Paradox," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 129-39, March.
  3. Traeger, Christian P., 2011. "Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguity," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt0gw7t7vn, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
  4. Yingyao Hu & Yutaka Kayaba & Matt Shum, 2010. "Nonparametric learning rules from bandit experiments: the eyes have it!," CeMMAP working papers CWP15/10, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  5. Craig R. Fox & Amos Tversky, 1995. "Ambiguity Aversion and Comparative Ignorance," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 585-603.
  6. Sujoy Mukerji & Peter Klibanoff, 2002. "A Smooth Model of Decision,Making Under Ambiguity," Economics Series Working Papers 113, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  7. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
  8. Clare Chua Chow & Rakesh Sarin, 2002. "Known, Unknown, and Unknowable Uncertainties," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 127-138, March.
  9. Rakesh K. Sarin & Martin Weber, 1993. "Effects of Ambiguity in Market Experiments," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 39(5), pages 602-615, May.
  10. Falk, Armin & Fehr, Ernst, 2003. "Why labour market experiments?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 399-406, August.
  11. Fabio Maccheroni & Massimo Marinacci & Aldo Rustichini, 2006. "Ambiguity Aversion, Robustness, and the Variational Representation of Preferences," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(6), pages 1447-1498, November.
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