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Natural Resources, Institutional Quality, and Economic Growth in China

  • Kan Ji
  • Jan Magnus

    ()

  • Wendun Wang
Registered author(s):

    The resource curse has been mainly studied using cross-country samples. In this paper we analyze a cross-province sample from one country: China. We focus on the interplay between resource abundance, institutional quality, and economic growth, using two different measures of resource abundance (a stock: resource reserves; and a flow: resource revenues), and employing various econometric approaches including varying coefficient models. We find that resource abundance has a positive effect on economic growth at the provincial level in China between 1990 and 2008, an effect that depends nonlinearly on institutional quality (1995 confidence in courts). The ‘West China Development Drive’ policy, initiated in 2000, caused substantial changes, which we investigate through a comparative panel-data analysis. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

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    Article provided by European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists in its journal Environmental and Resource Economics.

    Volume (Year): 57 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 3 (March)
    Pages: 323-343

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:57:y:2014:i:3:p:323-343
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100263

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