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Ecological Structure and Functions of Biodiversity as Elements of Its Total Economic Value

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  • Oliver Fromm

Abstract

Rational economic decisions regarding theconservation of biodiversity require the considerationof all the benefits generated by this naturalresource. Recently a number of categories of values(inherent value, contributory value, indirect value,infrastructure value, primary value) have beendeveloped, especially in the literature of EcologicalEconomics, which, besides the individual andproductive benefits of biodiversity, also include theutilitarian relevance of the ecological structure andfunctions of biodiversity in the, so-called, totaleconomic value. For the question of including theecological structure and functions of biodiversity inthe total economic value it is of crucial importanceto note, that these categories of values are not onlyterminologically different, but also relate todifferent ecological levels of biodiversity and – mostimportantly – to specific complementary relationships– between species, between elements of ecologicalstructures and between ecological functions and theircontribution to human well-being. This paper analysesthese complementary relationships, discusses theirimplications for the total economic value ofbiodiversity and draws conclusions for decision makingin environmental policy. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Suggested Citation

  • Oliver Fromm, 2000. "Ecological Structure and Functions of Biodiversity as Elements of Its Total Economic Value," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 16(3), pages 303-328, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:16:y:2000:i:3:p:303-328
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1008359022814
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Akpalu, Wisdom, 2009. "Economics of biodiversity and sustainable fisheries management," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(10), pages 2729-2733, August.
    2. Wamelink, G.W.W. & de Jong, J.J. & Van Dobben, H.F. & Van Wijk, M.N., 2005. "Additional costs of nature management caused by deposition," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 437-451, March.
    3. Timmons, David, 2013. "Social Cost of Biomass Energy from Switchgrass in Western Massachusetts," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 42(1), April.
    4. Tran Huu Tuan & Henrik Lindhjem, 2008. "Meta-analysis of nature conservation values in Asia & Oceania: Data heterogeneity and benefit transfer issues," EEPSEA Research Report rr2008072, Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA), revised Jul 2008.
    5. Nunes, P.A.L.D. & Nijkamp, P., 2011. "Biodiversity: Economic perspectives," Serie Research Memoranda 0002, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    6. Leandri, Marc, 2009. "The shadow price of assimilative capacity in optimal flow pollution control," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(4), pages 1020-1031, February.
    7. Lucia Vergano & Paulo A.L.D. Nunes, 2006. "Analysis and Evaluation of Ecosystem Resilience: An Economic Perspective," Working Papers 2006.25, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    8. Christie, Mike & Hanley, Nick & Warren, John & Murphy, Kevin & Wright, Robert & Hyde, Tony, 2006. "Valuing the diversity of biodiversity," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 304-317, June.
    9. Kassar, Ilhem & Lasserre, Pierre, 2004. "Species preservation and biodiversity value: a real options approach," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 857-879, September.
    10. Erik Ansink & Lars Hein & Knut Per Hasund, 2008. "To Value Functions or Services? An Analysis of Ecosystem Valuation Approaches," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 17(4), pages 489-503, November.
    11. Gerber, Nicolas, 2009. "Measuring Biodiversity – an axiomatic evaluation of measures based on genetic data," Discussion Papers 51305, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    12. Alexandre Rambaud & Jacques Richard, 2015. "Towards a finance that CARES," Post-Print halshs-01260075, HAL.
    13. Nijkamp, Peter & Vindigni, Gabriella & Nunes, Paulo A.L.D., 2008. "Economic valuation of biodiversity: A comparative study," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 217-231, September.
    14. Admiraal, Jeroen F. & Wossink, Ada & de Groot, Wouter T. & de Snoo, Geert R., 2013. "More than total economic value: How to combine economic valuation of biodiversity with ecological resilience," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 115-122.
    15. Henrik Lindhjem & Tran Tuan, 2012. "Valuation of species and nature conservation in Asia and Oceania: a meta-analysis," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 14(1), pages 1-22, January.
    16. Nunes, Paulo A. L. D. & van den Bergh, Jeroen C. J. M., 2001. "Economic valuation of biodiversity: sense or nonsense?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 203-222, November.
    17. Perry, Neil, 2010. "The ecological importance of species and the Noah's Ark problem," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 478-485, January.

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