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On Prison and Therapy

  • Volker Meier

    ()

This paper analyzes the choice of punishment levels where therapy and pure imprisonment are the two types of treatment. The incidence of a repeat offense depends on the offender’s criminal energy in a stochastic fashion. Therapy increases the depreciation rate of criminal energy. A combination of the two treatment types is never chosen since they constitute strong substitutes.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1011248528535
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Article provided by Springer in its journal European Journal of Law and Economics.

Volume (Year): 12 (2001)
Issue (Month): 1 (July)
Pages: 47-56

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Handle: RePEc:kap:ejlwec:v:12:y:2001:i:1:p:47-56
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100264

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  1. Fabel, Oliver & Meier, Volker, 1999. "Optimal parole decisions1," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 159-166, June.
  2. Steven Shavell & A. Mitchell Polinsky, 2000. "The Economic Theory of Public Enforcement of Law," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(1), pages 45-76, March.
  3. A. Mitchell Polinsky & Daniel L. Rubinfeld, 1991. "A Model of Optimal Fines for Repeat Offenders," NBER Working Papers 3739, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. O'Flaherty, Brendan, 1998. "Why Repeated Criminal Opportunities Matter: A Dynamic Stochastic Analysis of Criminal Decision Making," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 232-55, October.
  5. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters, in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Leung, S.F., 1993. "Dynamic Deterence Theory," RCER Working Papers 366, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  7. Manski, C.F. & Nagin, D.S., 1996. "Bounding Disagreements About Treatment Effects: A Case Study of Sentencing and Recidivism," Working papers 9526r, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  8. Kenneth L. Avio, 1973. "An Economic Analysis of Criminal Corrections: The Canadian Case," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 6(2), pages 164-78, May.
  9. Shavell, Steven, 1987. "A Model of Optimal Incapacitation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 107-10, May.
  10. Ehrlich, Isaac, 1981. "On the Usefulness of Controlling Individuals: An Economic Analysis of Rehabilitation, Incapacitation, and Deterrence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 307-22, June.
  11. Tauchen, Helen & Witte, Ann Dryden & Griesinger, Harriet, 1994. "Criminal Deterrence: Revisiting the Issue with a Birth Cohort," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(3), pages 399-412, August.
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