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An Activating Social Security System

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  • Tito Boeri

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Abstract

Convergence to the Lisbon employment targets requires absorbing large pools of long-term jobseekers, increasing labour force participation and dealing with a sizeable informal sector, composed for the most of low-productivity jobs. The purpose of this paper is to review the main design features of an activating social security strategy reconciling shifts of these three margins with the redistributive institutions characterising the European landscape. Evidence of experimental studies is reviewed. It is argued that EU supra-national authorities should confine themselves to promoting the exchange of information about best practices in welfare-to-work policies as implementation of this approach should be done at a decentralised level. Issues related to the implementation of this activating strategy in the countries that are more distant from the Lisbon targets are also discussed. Copyright Springer 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Tito Boeri, 2005. "An Activating Social Security System," De Economist, Springer, vol. 153(4), pages 375-397, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:153:y:2005:i:4:p:375-397
    DOI: 10.1007/s10645-005-2658-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    activation; employment conditional incentives; in-work benefits; J38; J63;

    JEL classification:

    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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