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Apocalypse Now? Fundamental Tax Reform and Residential Housing Values


  • Donald Bruce
  • Douglas Holtz-Eakin


Using a simulation model crafted to integrate the short-run and long-term impacts of tax" reform on the housing market, we find modest impacts from fundamental reform of the Federal" income tax. These results suggest that concerns over the impact of tax reform on housing values" and household net worth are overstated. To the extent that reform is otherwise desirable drastic effects on the housing market should not stand as an impediment to reform."

Suggested Citation

  • Donald Bruce & Douglas Holtz-Eakin, 1997. "Apocalypse Now? Fundamental Tax Reform and Residential Housing Values," NBER Working Papers 6282, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6282
    Note: PE

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Martin Feldstein, 1995. "The Effect of a Consumption Tax on the Rate of Interest," NBER Working Papers 5397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Richard K. Green & Patric H. Hendershott & Dennis R. Capozza, 1996. "Taxes, Mortgage Borrowing and House Prices," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 96-06, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lastrapes, William D. & Potts, Todd B., 2006. "Durable goods and the forward-looking theory of consumption: Estimates implied by the dynamic effects of money," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(8), pages 1409-1430, August.
    2. G. Carvalho, Pedro & Ribeiro, Alexandra, 2007. "Acnowledging for spatial effects in the Portuguese housing markets," MPRA Paper 6132, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Lastrapes, William D., 2002. "The Real Price of Housing and Money Supply Shocks: Time Series Evidence and Theoretical Simulations," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 40-74, March.
    4. Todd Sinai & Joseph Gyourko, 2004. "The (Un)changing Geographical Distribution of Housing Tax Benefits: 1980 to 2000," NBER Working Papers 10322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Tito Boeri, 2005. "An Activating Social Security System," De Economist, Springer, vol. 153(4), pages 375-397, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies


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