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Single Versus Multi-market Approach: An Application to the Greek Cotton Market


  • Dimitrios Dadakas


  • Stelios Katranidis



Estimation of the price-induced welfare effects in vertical and horizontal market settings may prove a tricky task when multiple price changes are taken into account. Whether a multi-market sequential approach or a single-market approach is used the well-established, theoretical result suggests that these two partial equilibrium methods are equivalent in terms of implied welfare changes. This paper develops the methodology to empirically compare these two methods. We estimate the welfare changes to Greek cotton–yarn producers induced by the simultaneous change in the prices of cotton–yarn and the cost of labor. Results substantiate the multi-market approach offers more accurate welfare estimates than the single-market approach, in empirical work. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2008

Suggested Citation

  • Dimitrios Dadakas & Stelios Katranidis, 2008. "Single Versus Multi-market Approach: An Application to the Greek Cotton Market," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 36(4), pages 469-481, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:36:y:2008:i:4:p:469-481
    DOI: 10.1007/s11293-008-9128-8

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jeong, Kyeong-Soo & Garcia, Philip & Bullock, David S., 2003. "A statistical method of multi-market welfare analysis applied to Japanese beef policy liberalization," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 237-256, April.
    2. Catherine L. Kling & Richard J. Sexton, 1990. "Bootstrapping in Applied Welfare Analysis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 72(2), pages 406-418.
    3. Stelios D. Katranidis & Elisavet I. Nitsi & David S. Bullock, 2005. "The effects of EU corn, cotton, and sugar beet policies on Greek producers: a multimarket analysis," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 33(s3), pages 423-430, November.
    4. Runar Brännlund & Bengt Kriström, 1996. "Welfare Measurement in Single and Multimarket Models: Theory and Application," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(1), pages 157-165.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dimitrios Dadakas & Stelios D Katranidis & David S. Bullock, 2009. "On the effects of technology improvements in multi-market models: Theory and evidence," Discussion Paper Series 2009_04, Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, revised Mar 2009.
    2. Dimitrios Dadakas & Stelios D. Katranidis, 2011. "Perspectives for the textiles and clothing industry in Greece: Past experience, outlook and policy implications," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, vol. 61(1-2), pages 13-38, January -.
    3. Dimitrios Dadakas & Stelios D Katranidis, 2009. "Trade Liberalization in T&C: An Overview of the Welfare Effects," Discussion Paper Series 2009_15, Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, revised Nov 2009.
    4. Bullock, David S. & Dadakas, Dimitrios & Katranidis, Stelios D., 2009. "Measuring the Effects of Technology Change in Multiple Markets : Application to the Greek Cotton Yarn Industry," MPRA Paper 67204, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2012.

    More about this item


    Welfare; Multi-market; Sequential; Single-market; Bootstrap; C10; D60; F10;

    JEL classification:

    • C10 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - General
    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General


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