IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Dragon multinationals: New players in 21 st century globalization

  • John Mathews

    ()

Registered author(s):

    This review article starts from the question: how does the global business system appear to a challenger firm, and how have challenger Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) from formerly peripheral areas such as the Asia Pacific established themselves successfully, against the sometimes fierce resistance of incumbents? To answer this question, the review develops an argument concerning the pluralistic character of the process of globalization, as contrasted with the conventional account that sees global processes creating uniformity and convergence. This alternative account is based on a review of the experiences of latecomer and newcomer MNEs, particularly those from the Asia Pacific—such as Acer, Ispat International, Li & Fung and the Hong Leong Group—that are dubbed “Dragon Multinationals.” I argue that the innovative features that these MNEs share, such as their accelerated internationalization, strategic innovation and organizational innovation, fit particularly well with the characteristics of the emergent global economy as one of complex inter-firm linkages. The core proposition of the review is that this complementarity between the characteristics of the emergent global economy and latecomer and newcomer strategic and organizational innovations is what drives the remarkable success of these Asia Pacific firms in establishing themselves as serious international players. Such a proposition carries implications for the process of globalization as well as for the dominant frameworks utilized in International Business. The review argues that Dragon Multinationals adopt a different perspective to the resources accessed through internationalization, and that this requires a rethink of the criteria normally utilized in resource-based accounts of strategy. The challenger firm internationalizing in order to access resources also poses a challenge to the dominant OLI (ownership, locational, internalization) account of multinational advantage. Thus it is argued that the question posed at the outset goes to the core of the IB frameworks, and thereby counts as one of the ‘big questions’ that should guide research in IB in the 21 st century. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10490-006-6113-0
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Asia Pacific Journal of Management.

    Volume (Year): 23 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 5-27

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:kap:asiapa:v:23:y:2006:i:1:p:5-27
    Contact details of provider: Postal: P.O. Box 17, 3300 AA Dordrecht, the Netherlands
    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=106589

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Alan M. Rugman & Alain Verbeke, 2004. "A Perspective on Regional and Global Strategies of Multinational Enterprises," Working Papers 2004-19, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.
    2. Mike W Peng, 2004. "Identifying the big question in international business research," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 35(2), pages 99-108, March.
    3. Tailan Chi & Donald J McGuire, 1996. "Collaborative Ventures and Value of Learning: Integrating the Transaction Cost and Strategic Option Perspectives on the Choice of Market Entry Modes," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 27(2), pages 285-307, June.
    4. Peter Nolan & Dylan Sutherland & Jin Zhang, 2002. "The Challenge of the Global Business Revolution," Contributions to Political Economy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(1), pages 91-110, December.
    5. Otto Andersen, 1993. "On the Internationalization Process of Firms: A Critical Analysis," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 24(2), pages 209-231, June.
    6. Dimitratos, Pavlos & Johnson, Jeffrey & Slow, Jonathan & Young, Stephen, 2003. "Micromultinationals:: New Types of Firms for the Global Competitive Landscape," European Management Journal, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 164-174, April.
    7. Clark, Terry & Knowles, Lynette L., 2003. "Global myopia: globalization theory in International Business," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 361-372.
    8. Nolan, Peter & Zhang, Jin, 2003. "Globalization Challenge for Large Firms from Developing Countries:: China's Oil and Aerospace Industries," European Management Journal, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 285-299, June.
    9. Phillips McDougall, Patricia & Shane, Scott & Oviatt, Benjamin M., 1994. "Explaining the formation of international new ventures: The limits of theories from international business research," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 9(6), pages 469-487, November.
    10. John H Dunning, 1995. "Reappraising the Eclectic Paradigm in an Age of Alliance Capitalism," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 26(3), pages 461-491, September.
    11. John H Dunning, 1988. "The Eclectic Paradigm of International Production: A Restatement and Some Possible Extensions," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 19(1), pages 1-31, March.
    12. Madsen, Tage Koed & Servais, Per, 1997. "The internationalization of Born Globals: An evolutionary process?," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 6(6), pages 561-583, December.
    13. Calof, Jonathan L. & Beamish, Paul W., 1995. "Adapting to foreign markets: Explaining internationalization," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 115-131, June.
    14. Rugman, Alan M., 2003. "Regional strategy and the demise of globalization," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 409-417.
    15. John A. Mathews, 2003. "Competitive dynamics and economic learning: an extended resource-based view," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 115-145, February.
    16. Louis T. Wells, 1983. "Third World Multinationals: The Rise of Foreign Investments from Developing Countries," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026273169x, June.
    17. Shone,Ronald, 2002. "Economic Dynamics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521017039.
    18. Bell, Jim & McNaughton, Rod & Young, Stephen, 2001. "'Born-again global' firms: An extension to the 'born global' phenomenon," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 173-189.
    19. Andersson, Ulf & Forsgren, Mats, 1996. "Subsidiary embeddedness and control in the multinational corporation," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 5(5), pages 487-508, October.
    20. Narula Rajneesh & Sadowski Bert M., 1998. "Technological catch-up and strategic technology partnering in developing countries," Research Memorandum 001, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    21. Peter J Buckley, 2002. "Is the International Business Research Agenda Running Out of Steam?," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 33(2), pages 365-373, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:asiapa:v:23:y:2006:i:1:p:5-27. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla)

    or (Christopher F. Baum)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.