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Historic Districts and Land Values



We measure the net effect of historic districting on the value of federally certified historic sites. The impact could be either positive or negative depending on the tension between positive externality effects and the constraints on property rights. Since federally certified historic parcels are not severely encumbered by regulations, we expect positive externality effects to dominate any negative effects of constraining rights. We find that the net effect of historic districting on land values is significantly positive. We also find that while residential parcels within historic districts attract a huge price premium of 131%, the premium associated with nonresidential parcels within historic districts is statistically insignificant.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul K. Asabere & Forrest E. Huffman, 1991. "Historic Districts and Land Values," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 6(1), pages 1-8.
  • Handle: RePEc:jre:issued:v:6:n:1:1991:p:1-8

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Joseph G. Kowalski & Peter F. Colwell, 1986. "Market Versus Assessed Values of Industrial Land," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 14(2), pages 361-373.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Narwold, 2006. "Historical Designation and Residential Property Values," ERSA conference papers ersa06p245, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Coulson, N Edward & Leichenko, Robin M, 2001. "The Internal and External Impact of Historical Designation on Property Values," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 113-124, July.
    3. Paolo Rosato & Anna Alberini & Valentina Zanatta & Margaretha Breil, 2009. "Redeveloping Derelict and Underused Historical City Areas: Evidence from a Survey�of�Real�Estate�Developers," Working Papers 2009_02, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    4. Douglas S. Noonan, 2013. "Market effects of historic preservation," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Cultural Heritage, chapter 17, pages i-i Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Jenny Schuetz & Arturo Gonzalez & Jeff Larrimore & Ellen A. Merry & Barbara J. Robles, 2017. "Are Central Cities Poor and Non-White?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-031, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Paul Cheshire & Gerard Dericks, 2013. "Regulation, Rents and 'Iconic Design': rent acquisition by design in the tightly constrained London office market," ERSA conference papers ersa13p1071, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Philippe Cyrenne & Robert Fenton & Joseph Warbanski, 2006. "Historic Buildings and Rehabilitation Expenditures: A Panel Data Approach," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 28(4), pages 349-380.
    8. Paolo Rosato & Anna Alberini & Valentina Zanatta & Margaretha Breil, 2010. "Redeveloping derelict and underused historic city areas: evidence from a survey of real estate developers," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(2), pages 257-281.
    9. Vicki Been & Ingrid Gould Ellen & Michael Gedal & Edward Glaeser & Brian J. McCabe, 2014. "Preserving History or Hindering Growth? The Heterogeneous Effects of Historic Districts on Local Housing Markets in New York City," NBER Working Papers 20446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Been, Vicki & Ellen, Ingrid Gould & Gedal, Michael & Glaeser, Edward & McCabe, Brian J., 2016. "Preserving history or restricting development? The heterogeneous effects of historic districts on local housing markets in New York City," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 16-30.

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    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services


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