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The Association Between Own Unemployment and Violence Victimization Among Female Youths

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  • Tertilt Michèle

    () (Department of Economics, University of Mannheim, L7, 3-5, Raum P11/12, 68161 Mannheim, Germany, and CEPR and BREAD)

  • Berg Gerard J. van den

    () (Department of Economics, Abteilung Volkswirtschaftslehre, University of Mannheim, L7, 3-5, 68161 Mannheim, Germany, and IFAU-Uppsala, IZA, ZEW and CEP)

Abstract

We estimate the association between the unemployment status of young women and the probability that they are subject to violence, using Swedish population register data covering the period 1999-2008. These data contain the highest-level classification of diagnoses made by medical experts at every individual in-patient and out-patient visit to medical care units, including every contact with a physician. We distinguish between domestic and non-domestic violence. It turns out that unemployed women are significantly more likely to be victimized than employed women with the same individual characteristics. This is mostly reflected in indicators of nondomestic violence and long-run abuse among unemployed female youths.

Suggested Citation

  • Tertilt Michèle & Berg Gerard J. van den, 2015. "The Association Between Own Unemployment and Violence Victimization Among Female Youths," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 499-513, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:235:y:2015:i:4-5:p:499-513
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Costas Meghir & Mårten Palme, 2005. "Educational Reform, Ability, and Family Background," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 414-424, March.
    2. Denis Fougère & Francis Kramarz & Julien Pouget, 2009. "Youth Unemployment and Crime in France," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(5), pages 909-938, September.
    3. Paul, Alexander & Nilsson, Anton, 2014. "The Effect of Copayments on Children's and Adolescents' Demand for Medical Care," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100403, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Audra J. Bowlus & Shannon Seitz, 2006. "Domestic Violence, Employment, And Divorce," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(4), pages 1113-1149, November.
    5. Anna Aizer, 2010. "The Gender Wage Gap and Domestic Violence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(4), pages 1847-1859, September.
    6. Tauchen, Helen V & Witte, Ann Dryden & Long, Sharon K, 1991. "Domestic Violence: A Nonrandom Affair," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 32(2), pages 491-511, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Paul, Alexander & Reinhold, Steffen, 2018. "Econometric analysis of the effects of economic conditions on the health of newborns," Working Paper Series 2018:24, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Dan Anderberg & Noemi Mantovan & Robert Sauer, 2018. "The dynamics of domestic violence: learning about the match," IFS Working Papers W18/12, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Fitzenberger Bernd & Gürtzgen Nicole & Pfeiffer Friedhelm, 2015. "Guest Editorial," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 352-354, August.
    4. Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Kambhampati, Uma & Rawlings, Samantha & Siddique, Zahra, 2018. "Intimate Partner Violence and the Business Cycle," IZA Discussion Papers 11274, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Paul, Alexander & Reinhold, Steffen, 2018. "Economic Conditions, Parental Employment and Health of Newborns," IZA Discussion Papers 11338, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Selim Gulesci, 2017. "Forced migration and attitudes towards domestic violence: Evidence from Turkey," WIDER Working Paper Series 110, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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