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The Impact of Household Shocks on Domestic Violence: Evidence from Tanzania

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  • Abiona, Olukorede

    (University of Leicester)

  • Koppensteiner, Martin Foureaux

    (University of Surrey)

Abstract

In this paper, we study the effect of household shocks on the incidence of domestic violence using household survey microdata from Tanzania. We use idiosyncratic variation in rainfall to proxy for shocks on household income of rural households. We find that droughts lead to a considerable increase of domestic violence in the households. A one standard deviation negative rainfall shock from the long-term mean increases the incidence by about 13.1 per cent compared to the baseline. We make use of the rich information from the household survey to investigate the underlying pathways.

Suggested Citation

  • Abiona, Olukorede & Koppensteiner, Martin Foureaux, 2018. "The Impact of Household Shocks on Domestic Violence: Evidence from Tanzania," IZA Discussion Papers 11992, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11992
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    Cited by:

    1. Mitra, Aniruddha & Bang, James T. & Abbas, Faisal, 2021. "Do remittances reduce women’s acceptance of domestic violence? Evidence from Pakistan," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 138(C).
    2. Olukorede Abiona, 2017. "Adverse Effects of Early Life Extreme Precipitation Shocks on Short-term Health and Adulthood Welfare Outcomes," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(4), pages 1229-1254, November.
    3. Tumen, Semih & Ulucan, Hakan, 2019. "Empowered or Impoverished: The Impact of Panic Buttons on Domestic Violence," IZA Discussion Papers 12847, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Díaz, Juan-José & Saldarriaga, Victor, 2020. "A Drop of Love? Rainfall Shocks and Spousal Abuse: Evidence from Rural Peru," MPRA Paper 102108, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    rainfall; household shocks; domestic violence; Tanzania;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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