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The spirit of the constitution. The institutionalized unsociability in Greece

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  • Savvas MAVRIDIS

    () (Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki)

Abstract

With this article attempts a comparison of the Greek Constitution of 1975, the constitutions of Germany, USA, Switzerland, Austria, France, UK and Italy on the issue of property relations and general interest, in order to highlight those notified differences relating to these communities and resulted in specific social situations. While the constitutions of the other countries, which are among the most representative democracies of the Western world, are characterized by an increased institutionalization of sociability, the Greek constitution on the issue of general interest takes an antisocial and, at best, neutral attitude. The convergence of the Greek constitution on this issue with the other constitutions is considered a prerequisite for overcoming the crisis and, more generally, for social development. This little effort hopes to contribute to a more social future formulation of the Greek constitution and a corresponding behaviour of Greek society

Suggested Citation

  • Savvas MAVRIDIS, 2017. "The spirit of the constitution. The institutionalized unsociability in Greece," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 9(2), pages 112-122, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:jes:wpaper:y:2017:v:9:i:2:p:112-122
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    References listed on IDEAS

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