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A First Approach on Modelling Staff Proactiveness in Retail Simulation Models



There has been a noticeable shift in the relative composition of the industry in the developed countries in recent years; manufacturing is decreasing while the service sector is becoming more important. However, currently most simulation models for investigating service systems are still built in the same way as manufacturing simulation models, using a process-oriented world view, i.e. they model the flow of passive entities through a system. These kinds of models allow studying aspects of operational management but are not well suited for studying the dynamics that appear in service systems due to human behaviour. For these kinds of studies we require tools that allow modelling the system and entities using an object-oriented world view, where intelligent objects serve as abstract 'actors' that are goal directed and can behave proactively. In our work we combine process-oriented discrete event simulation modelling and object-oriented agent based simulation modelling to investigate the impact of people management practices on retail productivity. In this paper, we reveal in a series of experiments what impact considering proactivity can have on the output accuracy of simulation models of human centric systems. The model and data we use for this investigation are based on a case study in a UK department store. We show that considering proactivity positively influences the validity of these kinds of models and therefore allows analysts to make better recommendations regarding strategies to apply people management practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Peer-Olaf Siebers & Uwe Aickelin, 2011. "A First Approach on Modelling Staff Proactiveness in Retail Simulation Models," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 14(2), pages 1-2.
  • Handle: RePEc:jas:jasssj:2010-41-2

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bloom, Nick & Dorgan, Stephen & Dowdy, John & Rippin, Tom & Van Reenen, John, 2005. "Management practices: the impact on company performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4604, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Gustavo Crespi & Chiara Criscuolo & Jonathan Haskel & Denise Hawkes, 2006. "Measuring and Understanding Productivity in UK Market Services," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 560-572, Winter.
    3. Jager, W. & Janssen, M. A. & De Vries, H. J. M. & De Greef, J. & Vlek, C. A. J., 2000. "Behaviour in commons dilemmas: Homo economicus and Homo psychologicus in an ecological-economic model," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 357-379, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Davide Secchi & Raffaello Seri, 2017. "Controlling for false negatives in agent-based models: a review of power analysis in organizational research," Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 94-121, March.


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