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Expectation horizon and the Phillips Curve: the solution to an empirical puzzle

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  • Charles R. Nelson

    (Department of Economics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA)

  • Jaejoon Lee

    (Samsung Research Institute of Finance, Seoul, Korea)

Abstract

Estimates of the slope of the Phillips curve reported in the literature cover a range from roughly − 0.6 to zero depending on specification. Forward-looking specifications, favored by theory, produce the smallest slope estimates. This paper addresses this puzzle by studying the bivariate process of inflation and unemployment in a fairly general unobserved components framework allowing for stochastic trends and related cycles. Analysis reveals that the slope of the implied Phillips curve will depend critically on the horizon of the forward-looking inflation expectation provided the cyclical component of unemployment is highly persistent. Empirical analysis results show that is the case, suggesting that the choice of expectation horizon, generally set at one quarter in the New Keynesian literature, may play an important role in this debate. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles R. Nelson & Jaejoon Lee, 2007. "Expectation horizon and the Phillips Curve: the solution to an empirical puzzle," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1), pages 161-178.
  • Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:22:y:2007:i:1:p:161-178
    DOI: 10.1002/jae.928
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    File URL: http://qed.econ.queensu.ca:80/jae/2007-v22.1/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Gertler & Jordi Gali & Richard Clarida, 1999. "The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1661-1707, December.
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    3. Arturo Estrella & Jeffrey C. Fuhrer, 2002. "Dynamic Inconsistencies: Counterfactual Implications of a Class of Rational-Expectations Models," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1013-1028, September.
    4. Gali, Jordi & Gertler, Mark, 1999. "Inflation dynamics: A structural econometric analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 195-222, October.
    5. Charles Nelson & Eric Zivot, 2000. "Why are Beveridge-Nelson and Unobserved-Component Decompositions of GDP so Different?," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0692, Econometric Society.
    6. Roberts, John M, 1995. "New Keynesian Economics and the Phillips Curve," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 975-984, November.
    7. Jeffrey C. Fuhrer, 1995. "The Phillips curve is alive and well," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 41-56.
    8. King, Robert G. & Watson, Mark W., 1994. "The post-war U.S. phillips curve: a revisionist econometric history," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 157-219, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Eijffinger, Sylvester C W & Qian, Zongxin, 2010. "Globalization and the Output-inflation Tradeoff: New Time Series Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 7718, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Smith, Ron P. & Pesaran, Mohammad Hashem, 2007. "Monetary Policy Transmission and the Phillips Curve in a Global Context," Kiel Working Papers 1366, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Florian Kajuth, 2016. "NAIRU Estimates for Germany: New Evidence on the Inflation–Unemployment Tradeoff," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 17(1), pages 104-125, February.
    4. Sophocles Mavroeidis & Mikkel Plagborg-Møller & James H. Stock, 2014. "Empirical Evidence on Inflation Expectations in the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 124-188, March.
    5. repec:spr:jqecon:v:15:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s40953-016-0059-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Pawel Baranowski & Zbigniew Kuchta, 2015. "Changes in nominal rigidities in Poland – a regime switching DSGE perspective," Lodz Economics Working Papers 6/2015, University of Lodz, Faculty of Economics and Sociology.
    7. Berger, Tino & Everaert, Gerdie & Vierke, Hauke, 2016. "Testing for time variation in an unobserved components model for the U.S. economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 179-208.
    8. Stephane Dees & M. Hashem Pesaran & L. Vanessa Smith & Ron P. Smith, 2009. "Identification of New Keynesian Phillips Curves from a Global Perspective," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(7), pages 1481-1502, October.
    9. Chang-Jin Kim & Pym Manopimoke & Charles R. Nelson, 2013. "Trend Inflation and the Nature of Structural Breaks in the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Discussion Paper Series 1305, Institute of Economic Research, Korea University.
    10. Tino Berger, 2011. "Estimating Europe’s natural rates," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 521-536, April.
    11. Vicente da Gama Machado & Marcelo Savino Portugal, 2014. "Phillips curve in Brazil: an unobserved components approach," Working Papers Series 354, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    12. Kajuth, Florian, 2012. "Identifying the Phillips curve through shifts in volatility," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 975-991.
    13. Tallman, Ellis W. & Zaman, Saeed, 2017. "Forecasting inflation: Phillips curve effects on services price measures," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 442-457.
    14. Juselius, Mikael, 2008. "Testing the New Keynesian Model on U.S. and Euro Area Data," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 2, pages 1-26.
    15. T. Berger, 2008. "Estimating Europe’s Natural Rates from a forward-looking Phillips curve," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 08/498, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    16. Winkelried, Diego, 2013. "Modelo de Proyección Trimestral del BCRP: Actualización y novedades," Revista Estudios Económicos, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú, issue 26, pages 9-60.
    17. Pym Manopimoke, 2012. "Hong Kong Inflation Dynamics: Trend and Cycle Relationships with the U.S. and China," Working Papers 232012, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    18. Findley, T. Scott, 2015. "Hyperbolic memory discounting and the political business cycle," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 40(PB), pages 345-359.
    19. Lahiri, Kajal & Sheng, Xuguang, 2008. "Evolution of forecast disagreement in a Bayesian learning model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 144(2), pages 325-340, June.

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