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Roma integration in European labor markets

Author

Listed:
  • Martin Kahanec

    (Central European University, Hungary, IZA, Germany, and CELSI, Slovakia)

Abstract

The Roma are the largest ethnic minority in Europe—as well as one of the most disadvantaged. A triple vicious circle is at play: Substandard socio-economic outcomes reinforce each other; they fuel negative attitudes and perceptions, leading to ill-chosen policies; and segmentation is perpetuated through (statistical) discrimination. A severe lack of data precludes progress. However, existing bits of evidence point to virtuous ways out.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Kahanec, 2014. "Roma integration in European labor markets," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-39, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:n:39
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Niall O'Higgins, 2010. "“It's not that I'm a racist, it's that they are Roma”: Roma discrimination and returns to education in South Eastern Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(2), pages 163-187, May.
    2. Gabor Kertesi & Gabor Kezdi, 2011. "The Roma/Non-Roma Test Score Gap in Hungary," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 519-525, May.
    3. Kahanec, Martin & Yuksel, Mutlu, 2010. "Intergenerational Transfer of Human Capital under Post-War Distress: The Displaced and the Roma in the Former Yugoslavia," IZA Discussion Papers 5108, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Gil S. Epstein & Ira N. Gang, 2010. "Migration and Culture," Working Papers 2010-17, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    5. Gábor Kertesi & Gábor Kézdi, 2011. "Roma employment in Hungary after the post‐communist transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 19(3), pages 563-610, July.
    6. Niall O'Higgins & Andrey Ivanov, 2006. "Education and Employment Opportunities for the Roma," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 48(1), pages 6-19, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pavel Ciaian & d'Artis Kancs, 2016. "Causes of the Social and Economic Marginalisation: The Role of Social Mobility Barriers for Roma," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 2016/03, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    2. Tudorel ANDREI & Andreea MIRICĂ & Daniel TEODORESCU & Elena-Doina DASCĂLU, 2016. "Main Determinants of Labor Force Participation in the case of Metropolitan Roma People," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(3), pages 144-163, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Roma; integration policy; discrimination; labor market; ethnic minority;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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