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Multiple-Constraint Choice Models with Corner and Interior Solutions

Author

Listed:
  • Takuya Satomura

    () (Faculty of Business and Commerce, Keio University, Tokyo 108-8345, Japan)

  • Jaehwan Kim

    () (Korea University Business School, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Korea)

  • Greg M. Allenby

    () (Fisher College of Business, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210)

Abstract

A choice model based on direct utility maximization subject to an arbitrary number of constraints is developed and applied to conjoint data. The model can accommodate both corner and interior solutions, and it provides insights into the proportion of respondents bound by each constraint. Application to volumetric choice data reveals that the majority of respondents make choices consistent with price and quantity restrictions. Estimates based on a single monetary-constraint choice model are shown to lead to biased estimates of the monetary value of attribute levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Takuya Satomura & Jaehwan Kim & Greg M. Allenby, 2011. "Multiple-Constraint Choice Models with Corner and Interior Solutions," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 30(3), pages 481-490, 05-06.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormksc:v:30:y:2011:i:3:p:481-490
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mksc.1110.0636
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Allenby, Greg M., 2017. "Structural forecasts for marketing data," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 433-441.
    2. Pradeep K. Chintagunta & Harikesh S. Nair, 2011. "Structural Workshop Paper --Discrete-Choice Models of Consumer Demand in Marketing," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 30(6), pages 977-996, November.
    3. Sikder, Sujan & Pinjari, Abdul Rawoof, 2013. "The benefits of allowing heteroscedastic stochastic distributions in multiple discrete-continuous choice models," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 9(C), pages 39-56.
    4. Steve Berry & Ahmed Khwaja & Vineet Kumar & Andres Musalem & Kenneth Wilbur & Greg Allenby & Bharat Anand & Pradeep Chintagunta & W. Hanemann & Przemek Jeziorski & Angelo Mele, 2014. "Structural models of complementary choices," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 25(3), pages 245-256, September.
    5. Castro, Marisol & Bhat, Chandra R. & Pendyala, Ram M. & Jara-Díaz, Sergio R., 2012. "Accommodating multiple constraints in the multiple discrete–continuous extreme value (MDCEV) choice model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 46(6), pages 729-743.
    6. Chandra R. Bhat & Subodh K. Dubey & Mohammad Jobair Bin Alam & Waleed H. Khushefati, 2015. "A New Spatial Multiple Discrete-Continuous Modeling Approach To Land Use Change Analysis," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(5), pages 801-841, November.

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