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Determining the causes of bank runs in Argentina during the crisis of 2001


  • George McCandless

    () (Central Bank of Argentina)

  • Maria Florencia Gabrielli

    () (Central Bank of Argentina)

  • María Josefina Rouillet

    () (Central Bank of Argentina)


We use monthly panel data information on Argentine banks to try to explain the variation in deposits during the 2001 crisis. The variables used are related to the solvency condition of the bank, whether it is public or private, interest rates for each bank and macroeconomic variables referred to general economic conditions. We use our empirical results to attempt to determine whether the bank run is best explained by a self-fulfilling prophecy theory or if fundamentals matter. We find that bank fundamentals show statistically significant coefficients, and with expected sign, providing evidence in favor of the solvency theory.

Suggested Citation

  • George McCandless & Maria Florencia Gabrielli & María Josefina Rouillet, 2003. "Determining the causes of bank runs in Argentina during the crisis of 2001," Revista de Analisis Economico – Economic Analysis Review, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines, vol. 18(1), pages 87-102, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ila:anaeco:v:18:y:2003:i:1:p:87-102

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Charles W. Calomiris & Gary Gorton, 1991. "The Origins of Banking Panics: Models, Facts, and Bank Regulation," NBER Chapters,in: Financial Markets and Financial Crises, pages 109-174 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Bond, Stephen & Bowsher, Clive & Windmeijer, Frank, 2001. "Criterion-based inference for GMM in autoregressive panel data models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 73(3), pages 379-388, December.
    3. Richard Blundell & Stephen Bond & Frank Windmeijer, 2000. "Estimation in dynamic panel data models: improving on the performance of the standard GMM estimator," IFS Working Papers W00/12, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    4. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    5. Richard Blundell & Stephen Bond, 2000. "GMM Estimation with persistent panel data: an application to production functions," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 321-340.
    6. Boozer, Michael A., 1997. "Econometric Analysis of Panel Data Badi H. Baltagi Wiley, 1995," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(05), pages 747-754, October.
    7. Xavier Freixas & Jean-Charles Rochet, 1997. "Microeconomics of Banking," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262061937, July.
    8. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brei, Michael & Schclarek, Alfredo, 2013. "Public bank lending in times of crisis," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 820-830.
    2. Gustavo Adler & Eugenio M Cerutti, 2015. "Are Foreign Banks a 'Safe Haven'? Evidence from Past Banking Crises," IMF Working Papers 15/43, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Virginia Goday & Bertrand Gruss & Jorge Ponce, 2005. "Depositors’ Discipline in Uruguayan Banks," Documentos de trabajo 2005003, Banco Central del Uruguay.
    4. repec:eee:jeborg:v:144:y:2017:i:c:p:87-96 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Karlo Kauko, 2016. "Does Opaqueness Make Equity Capital Expensive for Banks?," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL ROSARIO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO, vol. 17(2), pages 203-227, February.

    More about this item


    Corridas bancarias; datos de panel; fundamentals; variables macro; teoría de solvencia;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy


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