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Welfare Implications Of The Interaction Between Habits And Consumption Externalities


  • Jaime Alonso-Carrera
  • Jordi Caballé
  • Xavier Raurich


We analyze the welfare properties of the equilibrium path of a growth model where both habits and consumption externalities affect the utility of consumers. Our analysis highlights the crucial role played by complementarities between externalities and habits in order to generate an inefficient dynamic equilibrium. In particular, we show that the competitive equilibrium is inefficient when consumption externalities and habit-adjusted consumption are not perfect substitutes. Copyright 2006 by the Economics Department Of The University Of Pennsylvania And Osaka University Institute Of Social And Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaime Alonso-Carrera & Jordi Caballé & Xavier Raurich, 2006. "Welfare Implications Of The Interaction Between Habits And Consumption Externalities," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(2), pages 557-571, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:47:y:2006:i:2:p:557-571

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Harbaugh, Richmond, 1996. "Falling behind the Joneses: relative consumption and the growth-savings paradox," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 297-304, December.
    2. Jaime Alonso-Carrera & Jordi Caball?Author-Email: & Xavier Raurich, 2001. "Income Taxation with Habit Formation and Consumption Externalities," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 496.01, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    3. de la Croix, David, 1998. "Growth and the relativity of satisfaction," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 105-125, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wendner, Ronald, 2015. "Do positional preferences for wealth and consumption cause inter-temporal distortions?," MPRA Paper 64086, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Wendner, Ronald & Ghosh, Sugata, 2017. "Positional Preferences: Efficiency and Distortions under Welfarist- and Paternalistic Governments," MPRA Paper 77839, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Gómez, Manuel A. & Monteiro, Goncalo, 2015. "Internal habits in an endogenous growth model with elastic labor supply," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 583-595.
    4. Gómez Manuel A., 2010. "Endogenous Growth, Habit Formation and Convergence Speed," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-32, January.
    5. Alonso-Carrera, Jaime & Caballé, Jordi & Raurich, Xavier, 2008. "Can consumption spillovers be a source of equilibrium indeterminacy?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 2883-2902, September.
    6. Gómez, Manuel A., 2014. "Equilibrium dynamics in a class of one-sector endogenous growth models with external habits: An application of special functions," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 50-54.
    7. Manuel A. Gómez, 2010. "The welfare cost of external habits: a quantitative assessment," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 37(1 Year 20), pages 5-26, June.
    8. Tobias Koenig & Andreas Wagener, 2010. "Tax Structure and Government Expenditures under Tax Equity Norms," CESifo Working Paper Series 3205, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Koenig, Tobias & Wagener, Andreas, 2013. "Tax structure and government expenditures with tax equity concerns," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 137-153.
    10. Francisco Alvarez-Cuadrado, 2007. "Envy, leisure, and restrictions on working hours," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1286-1310, November.
    11. Ali Choudhary & Paul Levine, 2006. "The 24/7 Society and Multiple Habits," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0506, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    12. Nakamoto, Yasuhiro, 2009. "Jealousy and underconsumption in a one-sector model with wealth preference," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(12), pages 2015-2029, December.
    13. Chen, Been-Lon & Hsu, Mei, 2009. "Consumption externality, efficiency and optimal taxation in one-sector growth model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1328-1334, November.
    14. Chen, Been-Lon & Lee, Shun-Fa, 2007. "Import Tariffs and Growth in a Model with Habits," MPRA Paper 27667, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Gomez Suarez, Manuel A., 2008. "Utility and production externalities, equilibrium efficiency and leisure specification," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1496-1519, December.
    16. Rachel J. Huang & Larry Y. Tzeng, 2008. "Consumption Externality and Equilibrium Underinsurance," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 75(4), pages 1039-1054.
    17. Manuel Gómez, 2010. "A note on external habits and efficiency in the AK model," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 99(1), pages 53-64, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General


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