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Stochastic Replicator Dynamics

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  • Cabrales, Antonio

Abstract

This article studies the replicator dynamics in the presence of shocks. I show that under these dynamics strategies that do not survive the iterated deletion of strictly dominated strategies are eliminated in the long run, even in the presence of nonvanishing perturbations, I also give an example that shows that the stochastic dynamics in this article have equilibrium selection properties that differ from other dynamics in the literature. Copyright 2000 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Cabrales, Antonio, 2000. "Stochastic Replicator Dynamics," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 41(2), pages 451-481, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:41:y:2000:i:2:p:451-81
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    1. Samuelson, L., 1989. "Evolutionnary Stability In Asymmetric Games," Papers 11-8-2, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
    2. Fudenberg, D. & Harris, C., 1992. "Evolutionary dynamics with aggregate shocks," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 420-441, August.
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    7. Kandori Michihiro & Rob Rafael, 1995. "Evolution of Equilibria in the Long Run: A General Theory and Applications," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 383-414, April.
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    11. Oriol Amat, 1993. "The relationship between tax regulations and financial accounting: A comparison of Germany, Spain and the United Kingdom," Economics Working Papers 46, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    12. Dekel, Eddie & Scotchmer, Suzanne, 1992. "On the evolution of optimizing behavior," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 392-406, August.
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