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ICT and the Environment in Developing Countries: an Overview of Opportunities and Developments

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  • John HOUGHTON

    (Centre for Strategic Economic Studies, Victoria University, Australia)

Abstract

Both developed and developing countries face many environmental challenges, including climate change, improving energy efficiency and waste management, addressing air pollution, water quality and scarcity, and loss of natural habitats and biodiversity. Drawing on the existing literature, this paper presents an overview of how the Internet and the ICT and related research communities can help tackle environmental challenges in developing countries. The review focuses on the role of ICTs in climate change mitigation, mitigating other environmental pressures, and climate change adaptation.

Suggested Citation

  • John HOUGHTON, 2009. "ICT and the Environment in Developing Countries: an Overview of Opportunities and Developments," Communications & Strategies, IDATE, Com&Strat dept., vol. 1(76), pages 39-60, 4th quart.
  • Handle: RePEc:idt:journl:cs7602
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    File URL: http://repec.idate.org/RePEc/idt/journl/CS7602/CS76_HOUGHTON.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. -, 2009. "The economics of climate change," Sede Subregional de la CEPAL para el Caribe (Estudios e Investigaciones) 38679, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Chuanguo & Liu, Cong, 2015. "The impact of ICT industry on CO2 emissions: A regional analysis in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 12-19.
    2. Magazzino, Cosimo & Mele, Marco & Morelli, Giovanna & Schneider, Nicolas, 2021. "The nexus between information technology and environmental pollution: Application of a new machine learning algorithm to OECD countries," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).
    3. Kunofiwa Tsaurai & Bester Chimbo, 2019. "The Impact of Information and Communication Technology on Carbon Emissions in Emerging Markets," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 9(4), pages 320-326.
    4. Botang Han & Dong Wang & Weina Ding & Lei Han, 2016. "Effect of information and communication technology on energy consumption in China," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 84(1), pages 297-315, November.
    5. Bester Chimbo, 2020. "Information and Communication Technology and Electricity Consumption in Transitional Economies," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 10(3), pages 296-302.
    6. Antonio Fernández-Portillo & Manuel Almodóvar-González & José Luís Coca-Pérez & Héctor Valentín Jiménez-Naranjo, 2019. "Is Sustainable Economic Development Possible Thanks to the Deployment of ICT?," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(22), pages 1-15, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    information and communication technology (ICT); environment; climate change; mitigation; adaptation.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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