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A Dragon and a Dove? A Comparative Overview of Chinese and European Trade Relations with Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Bert Jacobs

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    As China’s footprint in African trade grows larger by the day, the need to contextualize this rise through comparative analysis becomes ever more necessary. This paper contrasts the sub-Saharan trade relations of both China and Europe with their respective designated stereotypes: those of a dragon and a dove. The article compares the trade dynamics on four levels: the policies and institutional mechanisms that shape the relationship; the composition of the trade flows; the geographic distribution of trade dominance; and the influence of norms and values on the trade pattern. It concludes that although there are empirical grounds behind these stereotypes, Chinese and European trade relations with sub-Saharan Africa are becoming more similar, partly due to a more hawkish European stance.

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    File URL: http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/479/477
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    Article provided by Institute of Asian Studies, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, Hamburg in its journal Journal of Current Chinese Affairs - China aktuell.

    Volume (Year): 40 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 17-60

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    Handle: RePEc:gig:chaktu:v:40:y:2011:i:4:p:17-60
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    1. Deborah Brautigam & Thomas Farole & Tang Xiaoyang, 2010. "China’s Investment in African Special Economic Zones : Prospects, Challenges, and Opportunities," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10202, The World Bank.
    2. Head, Keith & Mayer, Thierry & Ries, John, 2010. "The erosion of colonial trade linkages after independence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 1-14, May.
    3. Brautigam, Deborah, 2011. "The Dragon's Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199606290, December.
    4. Paul Collier & Anthony J. Venables, 2007. "Rethinking Trade Preferences: How Africa Can Diversify its Exports," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(8), pages 1326-1345, 08.
    5. Baier, Scott L. & Bergstrand, Jeffrey H., 2001. "The growth of world trade: tariffs, transport costs, and income similarity," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-27, February.
    6. de Sousa, José & Mayer, Thierry & Zignago, Soledad, 2012. "Market Access in Global and Regional Trade," CEPR Discussion Papers 9085, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Candau, Fabien & Jean, Sebastien, 2005. "What Are EU Trade Preferences Worth for Sub-Saharan Africa and Other Developing Countries?," Working Papers 18863, TRADEAG - Agricultural Trade Agreements.
    8. Jean-Claude Maswana, 2009. "Can China Trigger Economic Growth in Africa?," Chinese Economy, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 42(2), pages 91-105, March.
    9. Andrea Goldstein & Nicolas Pinaud & Helmut Reisen, 2006. "The Rise of China and India: What's in it for Africa?," OECD Development Centre Policy Insights 19, OECD Publishing.
    10. Giorgia Giovannetti & Marco Sanfilippo, 2009. "Do Chinese Exports Crowd-out African Goods? An Econometric Analysis by Country and Sector," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 21(4), pages 506-530, September.
    11. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/10187 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Karingi, Stephen & Oulmane, Nassim & Lang, Rémi & Sadni Jallab, Mustapha & Perez, Romain, 2005. "Assessment of the impact of the Economic Partnership Agreement between the ECOWAS countries and the European Union," MPRA Paper 13292, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Lawrence E. Hinkle & Maurice Schiff, 2004. "Economic Partnership Agreements Between Sub-Saharan Africa and the EU: A Development Perspective," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(9), pages 1321-1333, 09.
    14. Ian Manners, 2002. "Normative Power Europe: A Contradiction in Terms?," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 235-258, 06.
    15. David H. Romer & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1999. "Does Trade Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 379-399, June.
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