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Long-Run Growth and Income Distribution: Evidence for Italy and the US


  • Claudio Morana

    () (Università del Piemonte orientale)


In this paper we investigate the long-run growth process in Italy and the US over the period 1920-2001, using a common trends model. Coherent with the neoclassical growth model, we find that long-run economic growth can be explained by two permanent shocks, namely a technological shock and a labour supply shock. Interestingly, technological progress has an initial negative impact on the wage share, and a successive positive, but transitory impact on income equality for Italy, and a permanent and positive impact for the US, pointing to a cycle in income distribution. On the other hand, the labour supply shock has a transitory and positive impact on the wage share for Italy, and a permanent and negative impact on the wage share for the US, possibly reflecting different labour market institutional characteristics. Hence, fluctuations in the distribution of income should be expected as a consequence of economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudio Morana, 2003. "Long-Run Growth and Income Distribution: Evidence for Italy and the US," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 62(2), pages 171-210, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gde:journl:gde_v62_n2_p171-210

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    More about this item


    Markov switching; common trends; economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development


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